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Article: Decreased c-Jun expression correlates with impaired spinal motoneuron regeneration in aged mice following sciatic nerve crush
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TitleDecreased c-Jun expression correlates with impaired spinal motoneuron regeneration in aged mice following sciatic nerve crush
 
AuthorsYuan, Q1 3
Su, H1
Guo, J1
Tsang, KY1
Cheah, KSE1
Chiu, K1
Yang, J1
Wong, WM1
So, KF1 2
Huang, JD1
Wu, W1 2
Lin, ZX3
 
KeywordsAging
Axonal injury
Axonal regeneration
Motoneuron
Mouse
Transcription factor
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/expgero
 
CitationExperimental Gerontology, 2012, v. 47 n. 4, p. 329-336 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2012.02.006
 
AbstractPost-injury nerve regeneration of the peripheral nervous system declines with age, but the mechanisms underlying the weakened axonal regeneration are not well understood. Increased synthesis and activity of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun have been implicated in efficient motor axonal regeneration. In the present study, we evaluated the hypothesis that the impaired regenerative capacity in the aged is associated with impaired induction of c-Jun. In non-manipulated young adult or aged mice, no c-Jun and its phosphorylated form were detected in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Following nerve crush, significant c-Jun and phosphorylated c-Jun occurred in the injured motoneurons of young adult mice, but not in aged animals. In accord with the immunohistochemistry, Western blots also showed that sciatic nerve crush induced c-Jun and its phosphorylation expression in the ventral horn of young adult but not in aged mice. Changes in c-Jun mRNA level detected by in situ hybridization are congruent with that in c-Jun protein content, showing an increase at 5. days after crush in young adult but not aged. Moreover, compared with young adult mice, aged mice showed impaired motor axonal regeneration. These results demonstrate that the impaired motor axonal regeneration seen in aged mice is correlated with impaired c-Jun expression and phosphorylation following injury. These data provide a neurobiological explanation for the poor outcome associated with nerve repair in the aged. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
 
ISSN0531-5565
2013 Impact Factor: 3.529
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.592
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2012.02.006
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000302624500007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Chinese University of Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong
National Basic Research Program of China (973 program)2011CB504402
Hong Universities Grant CouncilAoE/M-04/04
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the University of Hong Kong and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 program; 2011CB504402). KY Tsang and KSE Cheah are supported by Hong Universities Grant Council project AoE/M-04/04. We thank Dr. IC Bruce of Zhejiang University School of Medicine for reading the manuscript.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsDevelopmental genomics and skeletal research
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorSu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, J
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorCheah, KSE
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, K
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorSo, KF
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, JD
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, ZX
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:05:20Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:05:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractPost-injury nerve regeneration of the peripheral nervous system declines with age, but the mechanisms underlying the weakened axonal regeneration are not well understood. Increased synthesis and activity of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun have been implicated in efficient motor axonal regeneration. In the present study, we evaluated the hypothesis that the impaired regenerative capacity in the aged is associated with impaired induction of c-Jun. In non-manipulated young adult or aged mice, no c-Jun and its phosphorylated form were detected in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Following nerve crush, significant c-Jun and phosphorylated c-Jun occurred in the injured motoneurons of young adult mice, but not in aged animals. In accord with the immunohistochemistry, Western blots also showed that sciatic nerve crush induced c-Jun and its phosphorylation expression in the ventral horn of young adult but not in aged mice. Changes in c-Jun mRNA level detected by in situ hybridization are congruent with that in c-Jun protein content, showing an increase at 5. days after crush in young adult but not aged. Moreover, compared with young adult mice, aged mice showed impaired motor axonal regeneration. These results demonstrate that the impaired motor axonal regeneration seen in aged mice is correlated with impaired c-Jun expression and phosphorylation following injury. These data provide a neurobiological explanation for the poor outcome associated with nerve repair in the aged. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Gerontology, 2012, v. 47 n. 4, p. 329-336 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2012.02.006
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10397378
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2012.02.006
 
dc.identifier.epage336
 
dc.identifier.hkuros199492
 
dc.identifier.hkuros210513
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302624500007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Chinese University of Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong
National Basic Research Program of China (973 program)2011CB504402
Hong Universities Grant CouncilAoE/M-04/04
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the University of Hong Kong and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 program; 2011CB504402). KY Tsang and KSE Cheah are supported by Hong Universities Grant Council project AoE/M-04/04. We thank Dr. IC Bruce of Zhejiang University School of Medicine for reading the manuscript.

 
dc.identifier.issn0531-5565
2013 Impact Factor: 3.529
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.592
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid22382134
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862829326
 
dc.identifier.spage329
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147661
 
dc.identifier.volume47
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/expgero
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Gerontology
 
dc.relation.projectDevelopmental genomics and skeletal research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAging
 
dc.subjectAxonal injury
 
dc.subjectAxonal regeneration
 
dc.subjectMotoneuron
 
dc.subjectMouse
 
dc.subjectTranscription factor
 
dc.titleDecreased c-Jun expression correlates with impaired spinal motoneuron regeneration in aged mice following sciatic nerve crush
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Wong, WM</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong