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Article: Heparan sulphates upregulate regeneration of transected sciatic nerves of adult guinea-pigs

TitleHeparan sulphates upregulate regeneration of transected sciatic nerves of adult guinea-pigs
Authors
KeywordsAxonal regrowth
Glycosaminoglycans
Heparan sulphates
Nerve bridge
Issue Date1999
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJN
Citation
European Journal Of Neuroscience, 1999, v. 11 n. 6, p. 1914-1926 How to Cite?
AbstractThe increased content of soluble glycosaminoglycan-containing forms in sciatic nerves during recovery from crush injury suggests that the glycosaminoglycans modulate the environment for post-traumatic tissue remodelling and axonal regrowth. To test this, defined amounts of soluble heparan sulphates from bovine kidney or guinea-pig nerve were introduced into the regenerating environment via silicone conduits that bridged 8-mm gaps of transected sciatic nerves of adult guinea-pigs. Controls were bridged using the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) vehicle or a chondroition sulphate preparation from whale cartilage. After timed periods of recovery, the animals were assessed for electromyographic signals at the target gastrocnemius muscle to determine the conduction velocity across the bridged nerve. Sections of the bridge were also histologically examined for nerve fibres. Transected sciatic nerves bridged with heparan sulphates or chondroitin sulphate showed earlier stimulated myelination of axons (week 5-6) than PBS-bridged nerves (week 9). Initial electromyographic indication of reconnection with the target was at week 9 post-transection. In the course of 20 weeks, transected sections of the bridge indicated similar numbers of unmyelinated axons irrespective of bridge material, but distinctly higher numbers of myelinated axons in heparan sulphate-bridged nerves than either PBS- or chondroitin sulphate-bridged nerves. At the end of the same period, heparan sulphate-bridged nerves resumed normal conduction velocities, but both PBS- and chondroitin sulphate-bridged nerves remained at 50% of that of the intact contralateral nerves. These results are the first to demonstrate that supplementation of soluble heparan sulphate to the fluid regenerative neural environment can restore functional, axonal reconnection of the severed nerve with the target muscle.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147437
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.130
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, CHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShum, DKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, YSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, KFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:03:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:03:43Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Neuroscience, 1999, v. 11 n. 6, p. 1914-1926en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0953-816Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147437-
dc.description.abstractThe increased content of soluble glycosaminoglycan-containing forms in sciatic nerves during recovery from crush injury suggests that the glycosaminoglycans modulate the environment for post-traumatic tissue remodelling and axonal regrowth. To test this, defined amounts of soluble heparan sulphates from bovine kidney or guinea-pig nerve were introduced into the regenerating environment via silicone conduits that bridged 8-mm gaps of transected sciatic nerves of adult guinea-pigs. Controls were bridged using the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) vehicle or a chondroition sulphate preparation from whale cartilage. After timed periods of recovery, the animals were assessed for electromyographic signals at the target gastrocnemius muscle to determine the conduction velocity across the bridged nerve. Sections of the bridge were also histologically examined for nerve fibres. Transected sciatic nerves bridged with heparan sulphates or chondroitin sulphate showed earlier stimulated myelination of axons (week 5-6) than PBS-bridged nerves (week 9). Initial electromyographic indication of reconnection with the target was at week 9 post-transection. In the course of 20 weeks, transected sections of the bridge indicated similar numbers of unmyelinated axons irrespective of bridge material, but distinctly higher numbers of myelinated axons in heparan sulphate-bridged nerves than either PBS- or chondroitin sulphate-bridged nerves. At the end of the same period, heparan sulphate-bridged nerves resumed normal conduction velocities, but both PBS- and chondroitin sulphate-bridged nerves remained at 50% of that of the intact contralateral nerves. These results are the first to demonstrate that supplementation of soluble heparan sulphate to the fluid regenerative neural environment can restore functional, axonal reconnection of the severed nerve with the target muscle.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EJNen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Neuroscienceen_HK
dc.subjectAxonal regrowthen_HK
dc.subjectGlycosaminoglycansen_HK
dc.subjectHeparan sulphatesen_HK
dc.subjectNerve bridgeen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAxons - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshChondroitin Sulfates - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDenervationen_US
dc.subject.meshGuinea Pigsen_US
dc.subject.meshHeparitin Sulfate - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electronen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Regeneration - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshSciatic Nerve - Drug Effects - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.titleHeparan sulphates upregulate regeneration of transected sciatic nerves of adult guinea-pigsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChau, CH: mchchau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailShum, DKY: shumdkhk@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSo, KF: hrmaskf@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, CH=rp00398en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShum, DKY=rp00321en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YS=rp00318en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySo, KF=rp00329en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1460-9568.1999.00615.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10336660-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033005498en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros40882-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033005498&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1914en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1926en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080720600009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, CH=10040110500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShum, DKY=7004824447en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YS=7403676627en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, KF=34668391300en_HK

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