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Article: Occupational exposure to anaesthetic gases: A role for TIVA

TitleOccupational exposure to anaesthetic gases: A role for TIVA
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.expertopin.com/loi/eds
Citation
Expert Opinion On Drug Safety, 2009, v. 8 n. 4, p. 473-483 How to Cite?
AbstractModern anaesthesia is still mostly administered by the inhalational route and there is increasing concern over its potential for pollution. One of the first gaseous anaesthetic agents was nitrous oxide and this is still widely used today despite being associated with adverse effects caused by depression of vitamin B12 function and diminished reproductive health. The use of halothane is associated with hepatitis but the adverse effects of newer halogenated hydrocarbons are less well recognised. Chronic exposure may cause reduction in antioxidant activity in plasma and erythrocytes, inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis, depression of central neuro-respiratory activity, increased DNA breaks, effects on cerebral blood circulation and altered renal function. Inhalational anaesthetics also have adverse environmental effects, including ozone damage and greenhouse gas effects. Levels of inhalational anaesthetics in the ambient air of operating theatres and recovery rooms often exceed those stated in national guidelines. Anaesthetic procedures can be modified and air-conditioning and air scavenging systems should be used to minimise the risks from occupational exposure and threats to the environment. Such contamination could be avoided with the use of total intravenous anaesthesia. © 2009 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147267
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.896
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.029
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
AstraZeneca
Funding Information:

The authors thank D Burton and H Wills from Caudex Medical, who provided some background material and arranged permission to reproduce figures. Caudex Medical was funded by AstraZeneca. The authors have received no payment in preparation of this manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrinh, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorYao, CLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:01:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:01:07Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationExpert Opinion On Drug Safety, 2009, v. 8 n. 4, p. 473-483en_US
dc.identifier.issn1474-0338en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147267-
dc.description.abstractModern anaesthesia is still mostly administered by the inhalational route and there is increasing concern over its potential for pollution. One of the first gaseous anaesthetic agents was nitrous oxide and this is still widely used today despite being associated with adverse effects caused by depression of vitamin B12 function and diminished reproductive health. The use of halothane is associated with hepatitis but the adverse effects of newer halogenated hydrocarbons are less well recognised. Chronic exposure may cause reduction in antioxidant activity in plasma and erythrocytes, inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis, depression of central neuro-respiratory activity, increased DNA breaks, effects on cerebral blood circulation and altered renal function. Inhalational anaesthetics also have adverse environmental effects, including ozone damage and greenhouse gas effects. Levels of inhalational anaesthetics in the ambient air of operating theatres and recovery rooms often exceed those stated in national guidelines. Anaesthetic procedures can be modified and air-conditioning and air scavenging systems should be used to minimise the risks from occupational exposure and threats to the environment. Such contamination could be avoided with the use of total intravenous anaesthesia. © 2009 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.expertopin.com/loi/edsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofExpert Opinion on Drug Safetyen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants, Occupational - Standards - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Intravenous - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Inhalation - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshGreenhouse Effecten_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshOperating Roomsen_US
dc.subject.meshOzone - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonnel, Hospitalen_US
dc.titleOccupational exposure to anaesthetic gases: A role for TIVAen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1517/14740330903003778en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19480607-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67650547315en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros160861-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67650547315&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage473en_US
dc.identifier.epage483en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267864700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5006963-

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