File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Comparison of stress in anaesthetic trainees between Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia

TitleComparison of stress in anaesthetic trainees between Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAustralian Society of Anaesthetists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aaic.net.au
Citation
Anaesthesia And Intensive Care, 2008, v. 36 n. 6, p. 855-862 How to Cite?
AbstractA postal survey was sent to anaesthetic trainees in Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia to compare work-related stress levels. Demographic data were collected. Anaesthetist-specific stressors, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Global Job Satisfaction scores were used for psychological testing. The response rates from Hong Kong and Melbourne were 64 of 133 (48.1%) and 108 of 196 (55.1%), respectively. Victorian respondents were older with greater family commitments, but more advanced in fulfilling training requirements. Hong Kong respondents, being faced with both the challenge of dual College requirements, exhibited consistently higher indices of stress (P <0.001) and less job satisfaction (P <0.001). Common occupational stressors related to dealing with critically ill patients and medicolegal concerns. Higher stress scores observed in Hong Kong trainees related to service provision and a perceived lack of resources. Despite the complex nature of stress, its antecedents and manifestations, an inverse relationship between emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction was evident in correlation analysis (P <0.001). This survey suggests that stress was present in some trainees in both areas. Hong Kong trainees may benefit from local development to address mental wellbeing as being important to fulfil this highly competitive training program.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147261
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.283
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChia, ACLen_US
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, THWen_US
dc.contributor.authorMan, SFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:01:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:01:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnaesthesia And Intensive Care, 2008, v. 36 n. 6, p. 855-862en_US
dc.identifier.issn0310-057Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147261-
dc.description.abstractA postal survey was sent to anaesthetic trainees in Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia to compare work-related stress levels. Demographic data were collected. Anaesthetist-specific stressors, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Global Job Satisfaction scores were used for psychological testing. The response rates from Hong Kong and Melbourne were 64 of 133 (48.1%) and 108 of 196 (55.1%), respectively. Victorian respondents were older with greater family commitments, but more advanced in fulfilling training requirements. Hong Kong respondents, being faced with both the challenge of dual College requirements, exhibited consistently higher indices of stress (P <0.001) and less job satisfaction (P <0.001). Common occupational stressors related to dealing with critically ill patients and medicolegal concerns. Higher stress scores observed in Hong Kong trainees related to service provision and a perceived lack of resources. Despite the complex nature of stress, its antecedents and manifestations, an inverse relationship between emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction was evident in correlation analysis (P <0.001). This survey suggests that stress was present in some trainees in both areas. Hong Kong trainees may benefit from local development to address mental wellbeing as being important to fulfil this highly competitive training program.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Society of Anaesthetists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.aaic.net.auen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnaesthesia and Intensive Careen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshAnesthesiology - Education - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshBurnout, Professional - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Graduate - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveys - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Personnel - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshJob Satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVictoria - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleComparison of stress in anaesthetic trainees between Hong Kong and Victoria, Australiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19115657-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56649092720en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros160840-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56649092720&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage855en_US
dc.identifier.epage862en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000261964000017-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats