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Article: Attitudes to basic life support among medical students following the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong

TitleAttitudes to basic life support among medical students following the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resuscitation
Citation
Resuscitation, 2006, v. 68 n. 1, p. 93-100 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: In 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) affected 1755 people in Hong Kong, including 386 health care professionals, some of whom were infected during resuscitation attempts of affected patients. This study seeks to explore whether this epidemic has altered the willingness of Hong Kong medical students to perform basic life support and mouth-to-mouth ventilation during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods: A questionnaire was used to survey Year 4 medical students at the end of their undergraduate anaesthesia attachment, during which basic life support (BLS) skills were taught. The survey was conducted during July and August 2003, approximately two months after Hong Kong was removed from the World Health Organisation SARS Infected Areas list, and was designed to examine student confidence in BLS skills, their perceptions of the risks associated with performing BLS and their willingness to perform BLS in varying situations. Results: The response rate was over 60% (35 from a possible 54). Students were positive regarding the adequacy of their BLS training. They were concerned about disease transmission during resuscitation but were less positive regarding whether the risks had increased due to SARS. In all situations they were significantly more likely to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation for a family member compared with a stranger (p < 0.001) and to withhold mouth-to-mouth ventilation if either vomit or blood were present in the victim's mouth. Conclusions: Hong Kong medical students feel able to perform BLS if required. They are concerned about the risk of disease transmission, including SARS, during resuscitation, but would be more likely to withhold mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in the presence of vomit or blood than due to a fear of contracting SARS. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147224
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.414
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.231
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCaves, NDen_US
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:00:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationResuscitation, 2006, v. 68 n. 1, p. 93-100en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-9572en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147224-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) affected 1755 people in Hong Kong, including 386 health care professionals, some of whom were infected during resuscitation attempts of affected patients. This study seeks to explore whether this epidemic has altered the willingness of Hong Kong medical students to perform basic life support and mouth-to-mouth ventilation during an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods: A questionnaire was used to survey Year 4 medical students at the end of their undergraduate anaesthesia attachment, during which basic life support (BLS) skills were taught. The survey was conducted during July and August 2003, approximately two months after Hong Kong was removed from the World Health Organisation SARS Infected Areas list, and was designed to examine student confidence in BLS skills, their perceptions of the risks associated with performing BLS and their willingness to perform BLS in varying situations. Results: The response rate was over 60% (35 from a possible 54). Students were positive regarding the adequacy of their BLS training. They were concerned about disease transmission during resuscitation but were less positive regarding whether the risks had increased due to SARS. In all situations they were significantly more likely to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation for a family member compared with a stranger (p < 0.001) and to withhold mouth-to-mouth ventilation if either vomit or blood were present in the victim's mouth. Conclusions: Hong Kong medical students feel able to perform BLS if required. They are concerned about the risk of disease transmission, including SARS, during resuscitation, but would be more likely to withhold mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in the presence of vomit or blood than due to a fear of contracting SARS. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resuscitationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofResuscitationen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiopulmonary Resuscitation - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduateen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfectious Disease Transmission, Patient-To-Professionalen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleAttitudes to basic life support among medical students following the 2003 SARS outbreak in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resuscitation.2005.05.014en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16219408-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-30144444004en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros109429-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-30144444004&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume68en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage93en_US
dc.identifier.epage100en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234960400011-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_US

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