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Article: A comparison of pain on intravenous injection between two preparations of propofol

TitleA comparison of pain on intravenous injection between two preparations of propofol
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.org
Citation
Anesthesia And Analgesia, 2005, v. 101 n. 3, p. 675-678 How to Cite?
AbstractPropofol is frequently used for sedation, induction, and maintenance of anesthesia. It is, however, associated with pain on injection. Propofol-Lipuro® has an oil phase that allows a larger proportion of propofol to be dissolved in it and, thereby, apparently reduces pain. However, studies investigating this have had methodological limitations. We devised a randomized, double-blind, crossover study comparing pain on injection between two preparations of propofol, Diprivan® and Propofol-Lipuro®, in subanesthetic doses. Sixty healthy patients received the drugs in random order via the same injection site separated by 10 min and a 0.9% saline flush. Pain was assessed using a verbal rating score (VRS) during and at 1-min time points after injection. Differences in VRS between the two propofol preparations at different time points in each patient were analyzed. In patients who were given Diprivan® first followed by Propofol-Lipuro® (group D-P), pain was significantly reduced with Propofol-Lipuro® compared with Diprivan® during initial injection (median difference in VRS = 2 [interquartile range 0-2], P = 0.002) and at 1 min (3 [0-4], P < 0.001). In patients who were given Propofol-Lipuro® first followed by Diprivan® (group P-D), no significant differences in VRS were shown. Propofol-Lipuro® is associated with reduced injection pain compared with Diprivan® and also seems to attenuate subsequent injection pain of Diprivan® when administered first. The mechanism is unknown, but may be related to a reduction in the concentration of propofol in the aqueous phase. ©2005 by the International Anesthesia Research Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147218
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.523
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, NCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, AYCen_US
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:00:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:00:51Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnesthesia And Analgesia, 2005, v. 101 n. 3, p. 675-678en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-2999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147218-
dc.description.abstractPropofol is frequently used for sedation, induction, and maintenance of anesthesia. It is, however, associated with pain on injection. Propofol-Lipuro® has an oil phase that allows a larger proportion of propofol to be dissolved in it and, thereby, apparently reduces pain. However, studies investigating this have had methodological limitations. We devised a randomized, double-blind, crossover study comparing pain on injection between two preparations of propofol, Diprivan® and Propofol-Lipuro®, in subanesthetic doses. Sixty healthy patients received the drugs in random order via the same injection site separated by 10 min and a 0.9% saline flush. Pain was assessed using a verbal rating score (VRS) during and at 1-min time points after injection. Differences in VRS between the two propofol preparations at different time points in each patient were analyzed. In patients who were given Diprivan® first followed by Propofol-Lipuro® (group D-P), pain was significantly reduced with Propofol-Lipuro® compared with Diprivan® during initial injection (median difference in VRS = 2 [interquartile range 0-2], P = 0.002) and at 1 min (3 [0-4], P < 0.001). In patients who were given Propofol-Lipuro® first followed by Diprivan® (group P-D), no significant differences in VRS were shown. Propofol-Lipuro® is associated with reduced injection pain compared with Diprivan® and also seems to attenuate subsequent injection pain of Diprivan® when administered first. The mechanism is unknown, but may be related to a reduction in the concentration of propofol in the aqueous phase. ©2005 by the International Anesthesia Research Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnesthesia and Analgesiaen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnesthetics, Intravenous - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshChemistry, Pharmaceuticalen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Over Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Methoden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInjections, Intravenous - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPain - Chemically Induced - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshPropofol - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.titleA comparison of pain on intravenous injection between two preparations of propofolen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1213/01.ANE.0000157564.91910.04en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16115974-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23944473341en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros100577-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23944473341&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume101en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage675en_US
dc.identifier.epage678en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231434500015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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