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Article: Preoperative Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) scores predict postcolectomy analgesia requirement

TitlePreoperative Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) scores predict postcolectomy analgesia requirement
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinicalpain.com
Citation
Clinical Journal Of Pain, 2000, v. 16 n. 4, p. 314-320 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: One aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of scores on the Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) that was administered before surgery to postoperative morphine consumption and patient-controlled analgesia. A second aim of the study was to compare the ability of MAPS administered postsurgery with the commonly used Numerical Pain Rating Scale to predict patient-controlled analgesia behavior. Design: The MAPS questionnaire measures pain, suffering, and well-being. It was administered to patients 1 day before and 1 day after left hemicolectomy for colon cancer. The relations of the two scores to postoperative pain control were determined. Patients: Thirty-four patients in the surgical ward of a general hospital admitted for colorectal cancer surgery participated in this study. Results: High preoperative MAPS scores on sensory and emotional words predicted postoperative morphine dosage, dose presses, and lockout presses. Greater morphine consumption was correlated positively with high presurgery MAPS scores in four of the eight "Suffering" subclusters (Depressed Mood, Anger, Anxiety, and Fear). High presurgery MAPS scores in 13 of the 17 "Sensory Qualities" subclusters (e.g., Bothersome, Intense Pain, Pain Extent, Incisive Pressure, Traction/Abrasion) were correlated positively with lockout presses. Neither the postsurgery MAPS nor the postsurgery Numerical Pain Rating Scale predicted patient-controlled analgesia behavior. Conclusion: The emotional states and attitudes of the patients toward pain before surgery are important factors in determining patient-controlled analgesia pressing behavior and postoperative demand for analgesics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147189
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.712
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsui, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, SBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:00:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:00:40Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Journal Of Pain, 2000, v. 16 n. 4, p. 314-320en_US
dc.identifier.issn0749-8047en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147189-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: One aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of scores on the Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) that was administered before surgery to postoperative morphine consumption and patient-controlled analgesia. A second aim of the study was to compare the ability of MAPS administered postsurgery with the commonly used Numerical Pain Rating Scale to predict patient-controlled analgesia behavior. Design: The MAPS questionnaire measures pain, suffering, and well-being. It was administered to patients 1 day before and 1 day after left hemicolectomy for colon cancer. The relations of the two scores to postoperative pain control were determined. Patients: Thirty-four patients in the surgical ward of a general hospital admitted for colorectal cancer surgery participated in this study. Results: High preoperative MAPS scores on sensory and emotional words predicted postoperative morphine dosage, dose presses, and lockout presses. Greater morphine consumption was correlated positively with high presurgery MAPS scores in four of the eight "Suffering" subclusters (Depressed Mood, Anger, Anxiety, and Fear). High presurgery MAPS scores in 13 of the 17 "Sensory Qualities" subclusters (e.g., Bothersome, Intense Pain, Pain Extent, Incisive Pressure, Traction/Abrasion) were correlated positively with lockout presses. Neither the postsurgery MAPS nor the postsurgery Numerical Pain Rating Scale predicted patient-controlled analgesia behavior. Conclusion: The emotional states and attitudes of the patients toward pain before surgery are important factors in determining patient-controlled analgesia pressing behavior and postoperative demand for analgesics.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.clinicalpain.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Journal of Painen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAnalgesics, Opioid - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshColectomyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMorphine - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshPain, Postoperative - Diagnosis - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value Of Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshPreoperative Careen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titlePreoperative Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) scores predict postcolectomy analgesia requirementen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, KF:jkfng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, KF=rp00544en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00002508-200012000-00007en_US
dc.identifier.pmid11153787-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034521164en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros57125-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034521164&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage314en_US
dc.identifier.epage320en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166122800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US

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