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Article: Radio leaks: Presenting and contesting leaks in radio news broadcasts
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TitleRadio leaks: Presenting and contesting leaks in radio news broadcasts
 
AuthorsJaworski, A2 2
Fitzgerald, R1 1
Morris, D2 2
 
KeywordsDiscourse
Leaks
Radio news broadcasts
Temporality
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105704
 
CitationJournalism, 2004, v. 5 n. 2, p. 183-202 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/146488490452003
 
AbstractThis paper analyzes the discursive construction and contestation of 'leaked' stories in news broadcast programmes. Drawing on a sample of BBC Radio 4 news programmes recorded between May and June 2000, we analyze four items of news presented as leaks about upcoming events. We suggest that these examples highlight the leaking of information as a valuable newsworthy commodity in that it not only allows news organizations to report what is going to be news before it happens but also enables speculative discourse as to the meaning of the event yet to happen. However, in order for a story to be accepted as a leak it must be seen to fulfil a number of criteria. With this in mind, we identify four features accompanying the introduction of the news items as leaks in the process of authentification: secrecy, authorship/ownership and future orientation. The article then discusses how these features are used when contesting the status of a news story as a leak, and how temporal play contributes to downgrading the content of the leak and, hence, its relevance, immediacy and newsworthiness. Copyright © 2004 SAGE Publications.
 
ISSN1464-8849
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.709
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/146488490452003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorJaworski, A
 
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMorris, D
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T03:24:20Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-29T03:24:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes the discursive construction and contestation of 'leaked' stories in news broadcast programmes. Drawing on a sample of BBC Radio 4 news programmes recorded between May and June 2000, we analyze four items of news presented as leaks about upcoming events. We suggest that these examples highlight the leaking of information as a valuable newsworthy commodity in that it not only allows news organizations to report what is going to be news before it happens but also enables speculative discourse as to the meaning of the event yet to happen. However, in order for a story to be accepted as a leak it must be seen to fulfil a number of criteria. With this in mind, we identify four features accompanying the introduction of the news items as leaks in the process of authentification: secrecy, authorship/ownership and future orientation. The article then discusses how these features are used when contesting the status of a news story as a leak, and how temporal play contributes to downgrading the content of the leak and, hence, its relevance, immediacy and newsworthiness. Copyright © 2004 SAGE Publications.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournalism, 2004, v. 5 n. 2, p. 183-202 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/146488490452003
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/146488490452003
 
dc.identifier.epage202
 
dc.identifier.issn1464-8849
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.709
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56549125511
 
dc.identifier.spage183
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147158
 
dc.identifier.volume5
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105704
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournalism
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectDiscourse
 
dc.subjectLeaks
 
dc.subjectRadio news broadcasts
 
dc.subjectTemporality
 
dc.titleRadio leaks: Presenting and contesting leaks in radio news broadcasts
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Queensland
  2. Cardiff University