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Article: 'This poll has not happened yet': Temporal play in election predictions

Title'This poll has not happened yet': Temporal play in election predictions
Authors
KeywordsBroadcast talk
Election campaigns
Future
Media discourse
News
Political discourse
Issue Date2008
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://dcm.sagepub.com
Citation
Discourse And Communication, 2008, v. 2 n. 1, p. 5-27 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough the past plays a large part in election campaigns, predictions and promises are its lifeblood, with the various parties promising great things if elected and predicting doom if not. Indeed the 'manifestos' usually published at the beginning of an election campaign are a study in pledges, promises and wishes that parties use to entice the electorate to vote for them. Whilst talk of the future often dominates election discourse, one aspect of the future that is largely passed over without comment is the actual make up of the result, despite the relentless publication of opinion polls results. However, towards the end of the general election campaign in the UK in 2001, the Conservative Party began to warn of the dangers of the Labour Party winning the election by a large majority. The media gave wide prominence to this event, seen as tantamount to conceding defeat to the Labour Party, though the reaction of all the main political parties was to downplay its significance. In this article, we explore the discursive manipulation of temporal relations in the 2001 election campaign, and the politicians' work in gaining political capital out of the Conservative Party 'breach' in the routine election prediction structure. © 2008 Sage Publications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147157
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.447
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.632
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJaworski, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T03:24:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T03:24:20Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiscourse And Communication, 2008, v. 2 n. 1, p. 5-27en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-4813en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147157-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the past plays a large part in election campaigns, predictions and promises are its lifeblood, with the various parties promising great things if elected and predicting doom if not. Indeed the 'manifestos' usually published at the beginning of an election campaign are a study in pledges, promises and wishes that parties use to entice the electorate to vote for them. Whilst talk of the future often dominates election discourse, one aspect of the future that is largely passed over without comment is the actual make up of the result, despite the relentless publication of opinion polls results. However, towards the end of the general election campaign in the UK in 2001, the Conservative Party began to warn of the dangers of the Labour Party winning the election by a large majority. The media gave wide prominence to this event, seen as tantamount to conceding defeat to the Labour Party, though the reaction of all the main political parties was to downplay its significance. In this article, we explore the discursive manipulation of temporal relations in the 2001 election campaign, and the politicians' work in gaining political capital out of the Conservative Party 'breach' in the routine election prediction structure. © 2008 Sage Publications.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://dcm.sagepub.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiscourse and Communicationen_HK
dc.subjectBroadcast talken_HK
dc.subjectElection campaignsen_HK
dc.subjectFutureen_HK
dc.subjectMedia discourseen_HK
dc.subjectNewsen_HK
dc.subjectPolitical discourseen_HK
dc.title'This poll has not happened yet': Temporal play in election predictionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJaworski, A: jaworski@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJaworski, A=rp01597en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1750481307085574en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-51649130718en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-51649130718&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage5en_HK
dc.identifier.epage27en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1750-4821-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272881300001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJaworski, A=7005806898en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFitzgerald, R=35793555000en_HK

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