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Article: Othering in gossip: "You go out you have a laugh and you can pull yeah okay but like..."

TitleOthering in gossip: "You go out you have a laugh and you can pull yeah okay but like..."
Authors
KeywordsGossip
Liminality
Othering
Self- and other-identities
Stories
Issue Date2005
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LSY
Citation
Language In Society, 2005, v. 34 n. 5, p. 447-494 How to Cite?
AbstractIt has been claimed that gossip allows participants to negotiate aspects of group membership, and the inclusion and exclusion of others, by working out shared values. This article examines instances of gossipy storytelling among young friends during which participants negotiate self- and other-identities in particular ways. Participants are found to share judgments not only about others' behavior but also about their own behavior through particular processes of othering. A range of discursive strategies place the characters in gossip-stories (even in the category called "self-gossip") in marginalized, liminal, or uncertain social spaces. In the gossipy talk episodes examined, social "transgression" might be oriented to as a serious matter and thus pejorated, or oriented to in a playful key and thus celebrated. This ambiguity - AP"Do we disapprove or approve, of this 'bad'behavior?" -means that in negotiating the identity status of "gossipees" liminality is constant. It is argued that othering, as an emergent category, along with the particular discursive strategies that achieve it, is an aspect of gossip that deserves further attention © 2005 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147152
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.525
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.034
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJaworski, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCoupland, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T03:24:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T03:24:19Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLanguage In Society, 2005, v. 34 n. 5, p. 447-494en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0047-4045en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147152-
dc.description.abstractIt has been claimed that gossip allows participants to negotiate aspects of group membership, and the inclusion and exclusion of others, by working out shared values. This article examines instances of gossipy storytelling among young friends during which participants negotiate self- and other-identities in particular ways. Participants are found to share judgments not only about others' behavior but also about their own behavior through particular processes of othering. A range of discursive strategies place the characters in gossip-stories (even in the category called "self-gossip") in marginalized, liminal, or uncertain social spaces. In the gossipy talk episodes examined, social "transgression" might be oriented to as a serious matter and thus pejorated, or oriented to in a playful key and thus celebrated. This ambiguity - AP"Do we disapprove or approve, of this 'bad'behavior?" -means that in negotiating the identity status of "gossipees" liminality is constant. It is argued that othering, as an emergent category, along with the particular discursive strategies that achieve it, is an aspect of gossip that deserves further attention © 2005 Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LSYen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLanguage in Societyen_HK
dc.subjectGossipen_HK
dc.subjectLiminalityen_HK
dc.subjectOtheringen_HK
dc.subjectSelf- and other-identitiesen_HK
dc.subjectStoriesen_HK
dc.titleOthering in gossip: "You go out you have a laugh and you can pull yeah okay but like..."en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJaworski, A: jaworski@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJaworski, A=rp01597en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0047404505050256en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644919101en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644919101&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage447en_HK
dc.identifier.epage494en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJaworski, A=7005806898en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCoupland, J=7005720748en_HK

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