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Article: 'We beat 'em': Nationalism and the hegemony of homogeneity in the British press reportage of Germany versus England during Euro 2000

Title'We beat 'em': Nationalism and the hegemony of homogeneity in the British press reportage of Germany versus England during Euro 2000
Authors
KeywordsCritical discourse analysis
Football
Nationalism
Othering
Press reportage
The nation
Issue Date2003
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105519
Citation
Discourse And Society, 2003, v. 14 n. 3, p. 243-271 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article analyses the press reportage (written texts and visual images) of the football game between Germany and England during Euro 2000. We examine how the press construct the nation as a homogeneous collective within which the (implied) reader is positioned as belonging. The article also examines the press coverage of civic disturbances involving England supporters. We demonstrate how the 'football hooligans' undergo 'othering' in the press through de-authentication, pejoration, homogenization, and minoritization and universalization. In doing so, the press are able to police the moral boundaries of what is considered normative in terms of membership within the national collective. We argue that the formulation of nationalism and the homogeneity and unity of the nation in the British press in relation to the England-Germany football game takes the form of three main strategies: separation, conflict and typification. Separation is predominantly realized in the rhetoric of 'us' and 'them', whereas conflict is largely made manifest through the use of military metaphors and war Imagery. Finally, typification is achieved by the use of stereotypes, representing the nation as 'timeless' and 'homogeneous', with those who do not conform being instantly 'othered'. It is postulated that in adopting the above stances with regard to the nation, the press reproduce and maintain hegemonic social relations, and in- and outgroup distinctions on both inter- and intranational lines. In other words, the papers support and uphold a hegemonic world order of sovereign nation states, who are responsible for the behaviour of their citizens.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147148
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.137
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.720
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBishop, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJaworski, Aen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T03:24:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-29T03:24:18Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiscourse And Society, 2003, v. 14 n. 3, p. 243-271en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0957-9265en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147148-
dc.description.abstractThis article analyses the press reportage (written texts and visual images) of the football game between Germany and England during Euro 2000. We examine how the press construct the nation as a homogeneous collective within which the (implied) reader is positioned as belonging. The article also examines the press coverage of civic disturbances involving England supporters. We demonstrate how the 'football hooligans' undergo 'othering' in the press through de-authentication, pejoration, homogenization, and minoritization and universalization. In doing so, the press are able to police the moral boundaries of what is considered normative in terms of membership within the national collective. We argue that the formulation of nationalism and the homogeneity and unity of the nation in the British press in relation to the England-Germany football game takes the form of three main strategies: separation, conflict and typification. Separation is predominantly realized in the rhetoric of 'us' and 'them', whereas conflict is largely made manifest through the use of military metaphors and war Imagery. Finally, typification is achieved by the use of stereotypes, representing the nation as 'timeless' and 'homogeneous', with those who do not conform being instantly 'othered'. It is postulated that in adopting the above stances with regard to the nation, the press reproduce and maintain hegemonic social relations, and in- and outgroup distinctions on both inter- and intranational lines. In other words, the papers support and uphold a hegemonic world order of sovereign nation states, who are responsible for the behaviour of their citizens.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105519en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiscourse and Societyen_HK
dc.subjectCritical discourse analysisen_HK
dc.subjectFootballen_HK
dc.subjectNationalismen_HK
dc.subjectOtheringen_HK
dc.subjectPress reportageen_HK
dc.subjectThe nationen_HK
dc.title'We beat 'em': Nationalism and the hegemony of homogeneity in the British press reportage of Germany versus England during Euro 2000en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJaworski, A: jaworski@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJaworski, A=rp01597en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/09579265030143001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037269750en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037269750&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage243en_HK
dc.identifier.epage271en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBishop, H=7006226453en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJaworski, A=7005806898en_HK

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