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Article: Left, right, left, right, eyes to the front! Muller-Lyer bias in grasping is not a function of hand used, hand preferred or visual hemifield, but foveation does matter
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TitleLeft, right, left, right, eyes to the front! Muller-Lyer bias in grasping is not a function of hand used, hand preferred or visual hemifield, but foveation does matter
 
AuthorsVan Der Kamp, J1 2
De Wit, MM1
Masters, RSW1
 
KeywordsHandedness
Perception-action
Peripheral visual field
Visual hemifield
Visual illusions
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htm
 
CitationExperimental Brain Research, 2012, v. 218 n. 1, p. 91-98 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3007-x
 
AbstractWe investigated whether the control of movement of the left hand is more likely to involve the use of allocentric information than movements performed with the right hand. Previous studies (Gonzalez et al. in J Neurophys 95:3496-3501, 2006; De Grave et al. in Exp Br Res 193:421-427, 2009) have reported contradictory findings in this respect. In the present study, right-handed participants (N = 12) and left-handed participants (N = 12) made right- and left-handed grasps to foveated objects and peripheral, non-foveated objects that were located in the right or left visual hemifield and embedded within a Müller-Lyer illusion. They were also asked to judge the size of the object by matching their hand aperture to its length. Hand apertures did not show significant differences in illusory bias as a function of hand used, handedness or visual hemifield. However, the illusory effect was significantly larger for perception than for action, and for the non-foveated compared to foveated objects. No significant illusory biases were found for reach movement times. These findings are consistent with the two-visual system model that holds that the use of allocentric information is more prominent in perception than in movement control. We propose that the increased involvement of allocentric information in movements toward peripheral, non-foveated objects may be a consequence of more awkward, less automatized grasps of nonfoveated than foveated objects. The current study does not support the conjecture that the control of left-handed and right-handed grasps is predicated on different sources of information. © 2012 The Author(s).
 
ISSN0014-4819
2012 Impact Factor: 2.221
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.148
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3007-x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000302247800010
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Kamp, J
 
dc.contributor.authorDe Wit, MM
 
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSW
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-28T08:18:41Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-28T08:18:41Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether the control of movement of the left hand is more likely to involve the use of allocentric information than movements performed with the right hand. Previous studies (Gonzalez et al. in J Neurophys 95:3496-3501, 2006; De Grave et al. in Exp Br Res 193:421-427, 2009) have reported contradictory findings in this respect. In the present study, right-handed participants (N = 12) and left-handed participants (N = 12) made right- and left-handed grasps to foveated objects and peripheral, non-foveated objects that were located in the right or left visual hemifield and embedded within a Müller-Lyer illusion. They were also asked to judge the size of the object by matching their hand aperture to its length. Hand apertures did not show significant differences in illusory bias as a function of hand used, handedness or visual hemifield. However, the illusory effect was significantly larger for perception than for action, and for the non-foveated compared to foveated objects. No significant illusory biases were found for reach movement times. These findings are consistent with the two-visual system model that holds that the use of allocentric information is more prominent in perception than in movement control. We propose that the increased involvement of allocentric information in movements toward peripheral, non-foveated objects may be a consequence of more awkward, less automatized grasps of nonfoveated than foveated objects. The current study does not support the conjecture that the control of left-handed and right-handed grasps is predicated on different sources of information. © 2012 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 28 May 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Brain Research, 2012, v. 218 n. 1, p. 91-98 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3007-x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10310720
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3007-x
 
dc.identifier.eissn1432-1106
 
dc.identifier.epage98
 
dc.identifier.hkuros207962
 
dc.identifier.hkuros210985
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302247800010
 
dc.identifier.issn0014-4819
2012 Impact Factor: 2.221
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.148
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid22278110
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859162854
 
dc.identifier.spage91
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147119
 
dc.identifier.volume218
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00221/index.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental Brain Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThe Author(s)
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectHandedness
 
dc.subjectPerception-action
 
dc.subjectPeripheral visual field
 
dc.subjectVisual hemifield
 
dc.subjectVisual illusions
 
dc.titleLeft, right, left, right, eyes to the front! Muller-Lyer bias in grasping is not a function of hand used, hand preferred or visual hemifield, but foveation does matter
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam