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Conference Paper: Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma
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TitleLiver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma
 
AuthorsMazzaferro, V5
Chun, YS6
Poon, RTP2
Schwartz, ME7
Yao, FY1
Marsh, JW4
Bhoori, S5
Lee, SG3
 
KeywordsHepatocellular
Hepatoma
Transplantation
 
Issue Date2008
 
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annalssurgicaloncology.org
 
CitationAnnals Of Surgical Oncology, 2008, v. 15 n. 4, p. 1001-1007 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-007-9559-5
 
AbstractBackground: Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the best available option for early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its application is limited by stringent selection criteria, costs, and deceased donor graft shortage, particularly in Asia, where living donor liver transplant (LDLT) has been developed. Methods: This article reviews the present standards for patient selection represented by size-and-number criteria with particular references to Milan Criteria and novel prediction models based on results achieved in patients exceeding those limits, with consideration of the expanded indication represented by the UCSF Criteria. Results: The expected outcomes after deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) or LDLT are favorable if predetermined selection criteria are applied. However, selection bias, difference in waiting time, and ischemia-regeneration injuries of the graft among DDLT vs LDLT may influence long-term results. In the article, the differences between East and West in first-line treatments for HCC (resection vs transplantation), indications, and ethics for the donor, are summarized as well as possible novel predictors of tumor biology (especially DNA mutation and fractional allelic loss, FAI) to be considered for better outcome prediction. Conclusions: Liver transplantation remains the most promising product of modern surgery and represents a cornerstone in the management of patients with HCC. © 2007 The Author(s).
 
ISSN1068-9265
2012 Impact Factor: 4.12
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.793
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-007-9559-5
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000253896000009
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMazzaferro, V
 
dc.contributor.authorChun, YS
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RTP
 
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, ME
 
dc.contributor.authorYao, FY
 
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, JW
 
dc.contributor.authorBhoori, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, SG
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-25T07:50:40Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-25T07:50:40Z
 
dc.date.issued2008
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the best available option for early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its application is limited by stringent selection criteria, costs, and deceased donor graft shortage, particularly in Asia, where living donor liver transplant (LDLT) has been developed. Methods: This article reviews the present standards for patient selection represented by size-and-number criteria with particular references to Milan Criteria and novel prediction models based on results achieved in patients exceeding those limits, with consideration of the expanded indication represented by the UCSF Criteria. Results: The expected outcomes after deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) or LDLT are favorable if predetermined selection criteria are applied. However, selection bias, difference in waiting time, and ischemia-regeneration injuries of the graft among DDLT vs LDLT may influence long-term results. In the article, the differences between East and West in first-line treatments for HCC (resection vs transplantation), indications, and ethics for the donor, are summarized as well as possible novel predictors of tumor biology (especially DNA mutation and fractional allelic loss, FAI) to be considered for better outcome prediction. Conclusions: Liver transplantation remains the most promising product of modern surgery and represents a cornerstone in the management of patients with HCC. © 2007 The Author(s).
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.otherSpringer Open Choice, 25 May 2012
 
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Surgical Oncology, 2008, v. 15 n. 4, p. 1001-1007 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-007-9559-5
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-007-9559-5
 
dc.identifier.eissn1534-4681
 
dc.identifier.epage1007
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253896000009
 
dc.identifier.issn1068-9265
2012 Impact Factor: 4.12
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.793
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid18236119
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-40549119470
 
dc.identifier.spage1001
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147096
 
dc.identifier.volume15
 
dc.languageEng
 
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.annalssurgicaloncology.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Surgical Oncology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsSpringer New York
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectHepatocellular
 
dc.subjectHepatoma
 
dc.subjectTransplantation
 
dc.titleLiver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<contributor.author>Chun, YS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Poon, RTP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Schwartz, ME</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yao, FY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Marsh, JW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Bhoori, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lee, SG</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background: Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the best available option for early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its application is limited by stringent selection criteria, costs, and deceased donor graft shortage, particularly in Asia, where living donor liver transplant (LDLT) has been developed. Methods: This article reviews the present standards for patient selection represented by size-and-number criteria with particular references to Milan Criteria and novel prediction models based on results achieved in patients exceeding those limits, with consideration of the expanded indication represented by the UCSF Criteria. Results: The expected outcomes after deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT) or LDLT are favorable if predetermined selection criteria are applied. However, selection bias, difference in waiting time, and ischemia-regeneration injuries of the graft among DDLT vs LDLT may influence long-term results. In the article, the differences between East and West in first-line treatments for HCC (resection vs transplantation), indications, and ethics for the donor, are summarized as well as possible novel predictors of tumor biology (especially DNA mutation and fractional allelic loss, FAI) to be considered for better outcome prediction. Conclusions: Liver transplantation remains the most promising product of modern surgery and represents a cornerstone in the management of patients with HCC. &#169; 2007 The Author(s).</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of California, San Francisco
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Ulsan University
  4. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
  5. Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan
  6. University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
  7. The Mount Sinai Hospital