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Article: Water security for a planet under pressure: Interconnected challenges of a changing world call for sustainable solutions

TitleWater security for a planet under pressure: Interconnected challenges of a changing world call for sustainable solutions
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/718675/description#description
Citation
Current Opinion In Environmental Sustainability, 2012, v. 4 n. 1, p. 35-43 How to Cite?
AbstractSustainability, equitable allocation and protection of water resources must occur within the framework of integrated management and water governance, but its implementation is problematic. Ongoing global climate change, increasing population, urbanization, and aspirations for better living standards present a challenge to the planetary sustainability. While water use at global scale currently seems to be within its planetary boundary, shortages prevail in several water-scarce and overpopulated regions, and are projected to increase. Furthermore large-scale impoverishment of aquatic biodiversity, ecosystem degradation and reductions in water quality are unaddressed 'side effects' in areas where water can be secured for human and economic uses. As the world prepares for Rio+20, challenges to the sustainability of global water security should be scrutinized. Of particular concern is the likelihood that the water-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) targets may not be achievable due to lack of funding commitments, and a failure of delivery mechanisms including water governance. Constraints on water availability and reductions in water quality jeopardize secure access to this resource for all legitimate stakeholders, including aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Water connects several socio-ecological, economic and geophysical systems at multiple scales and hence constitutes a 'global water system'. This should be considered both in technical interventions and in governance frameworks. Humans have been changing the global water system in globally significant ways since the industrial revolution, yet without adequate knowledge of the system and its response to change; and without sufficient understanding of how to govern the system at local and global scales. Water security in the 21st century will require better linkage of science and policy, as well as innovative and cross-sectoral initiatives, adaptive management and polycentric governance models that involve all stakeholders. Consensus solutions will need to be achieved by evidence-based mediation, rather than following untested 'panaceas', so as to ensure equitable and sustainable global water use. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147040
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.658
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.374
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBogardi, JJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLawford, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorFlinkerbusch, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorMeyn, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPahlWostl, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVielhauer, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorVörösmarty, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:54:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:54:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Opinion In Environmental Sustainability, 2012, v. 4 n. 1, p. 35-43en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1877-3435en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147040-
dc.description.abstractSustainability, equitable allocation and protection of water resources must occur within the framework of integrated management and water governance, but its implementation is problematic. Ongoing global climate change, increasing population, urbanization, and aspirations for better living standards present a challenge to the planetary sustainability. While water use at global scale currently seems to be within its planetary boundary, shortages prevail in several water-scarce and overpopulated regions, and are projected to increase. Furthermore large-scale impoverishment of aquatic biodiversity, ecosystem degradation and reductions in water quality are unaddressed 'side effects' in areas where water can be secured for human and economic uses. As the world prepares for Rio+20, challenges to the sustainability of global water security should be scrutinized. Of particular concern is the likelihood that the water-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) targets may not be achievable due to lack of funding commitments, and a failure of delivery mechanisms including water governance. Constraints on water availability and reductions in water quality jeopardize secure access to this resource for all legitimate stakeholders, including aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Water connects several socio-ecological, economic and geophysical systems at multiple scales and hence constitutes a 'global water system'. This should be considered both in technical interventions and in governance frameworks. Humans have been changing the global water system in globally significant ways since the industrial revolution, yet without adequate knowledge of the system and its response to change; and without sufficient understanding of how to govern the system at local and global scales. Water security in the 21st century will require better linkage of science and policy, as well as innovative and cross-sectoral initiatives, adaptive management and polycentric governance models that involve all stakeholders. Consensus solutions will need to be achieved by evidence-based mediation, rather than following untested 'panaceas', so as to ensure equitable and sustainable global water use. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/718675/description#descriptionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainabilityen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal title>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#en_US
dc.titleWater security for a planet under pressure: Interconnected challenges of a changing world call for sustainable solutionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cosust.2011.12.002en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857915948en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199556en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857915948&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage35en_HK
dc.identifier.epage43en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302507600005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBogardi, JJ=54895417400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLawford, R=54895871500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFlinkerbusch, E=54896145000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMeyn, A=14323487400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPahlWostl, C=6701479303en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVielhauer, K=54896126700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVörösmarty, C=7003886966en_HK

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