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Article: Asian river fishes in the Anthropocene: Threats and conservation challenges in an era of rapid environmental change

TitleAsian river fishes in the Anthropocene: Threats and conservation challenges in an era of rapid environmental change
Authors
KeywordsClimate change
Dams
Flow alteration
Mekong
Overfishing
Yangtze
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JFB
Citation
Journal Of Fish Biology, 2011, v. 79 n. 6, p. 1487-1524 How to Cite?
AbstractThis review compares and contrasts the environmental changes that have influenced, or will influence, fishes and fisheries in the Yangtze and Mekong Rivers. These two rivers have been chosen because they differ markedly in the type and intensity of prevailing threats. The Mekong is relatively pristine, whereas the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze is the world's largest dam representing the apotheosis of environmental alteration of Asian rivers thus far. Moreover, it is situated at the foot of a planned cascade of at least 12 new dams on the upper Yangtze. Anthropogenic effects of dams and pollution of Yangtze fishes will be exacerbated by plans to divert water northwards along three transfer routes, in part to supplement the flow of the Yellow River. Adaptation to climate change will undoubtedly stimulate more dam construction and flow regulation, potentially causing perfect storm conditions for fishes in the Yangtze. China has already built dams along the upper course of the Mekong, and there are plans for as many as 11 mainstream dams in People's Democratic Republic (Laos) and Cambodia in the lower Mekong Basin. If built, they could have profound consequences for biodiversity, fisheries and human livelihoods, and such concerns have stalled dam construction. Potential effects of dams proposed for other rivers (such as Nujiang-Salween) are also cause for concern. Conservation or restoration measures to sustain some semblance of the rich fish biodiversity of Asian rivers can be identified, but their implementation may prove problematic in a context of increasing Anthropocene alteration of these ecosystems. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147036
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.246
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.952
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:54:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:54:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Fish Biology, 2011, v. 79 n. 6, p. 1487-1524en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1112en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/147036-
dc.description.abstractThis review compares and contrasts the environmental changes that have influenced, or will influence, fishes and fisheries in the Yangtze and Mekong Rivers. These two rivers have been chosen because they differ markedly in the type and intensity of prevailing threats. The Mekong is relatively pristine, whereas the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze is the world's largest dam representing the apotheosis of environmental alteration of Asian rivers thus far. Moreover, it is situated at the foot of a planned cascade of at least 12 new dams on the upper Yangtze. Anthropogenic effects of dams and pollution of Yangtze fishes will be exacerbated by plans to divert water northwards along three transfer routes, in part to supplement the flow of the Yellow River. Adaptation to climate change will undoubtedly stimulate more dam construction and flow regulation, potentially causing perfect storm conditions for fishes in the Yangtze. China has already built dams along the upper course of the Mekong, and there are plans for as many as 11 mainstream dams in People's Democratic Republic (Laos) and Cambodia in the lower Mekong Basin. If built, they could have profound consequences for biodiversity, fisheries and human livelihoods, and such concerns have stalled dam construction. Potential effects of dams proposed for other rivers (such as Nujiang-Salween) are also cause for concern. Conservation or restoration measures to sustain some semblance of the rich fish biodiversity of Asian rivers can be identified, but their implementation may prove problematic in a context of increasing Anthropocene alteration of these ecosystems. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Fish Biology © 2011 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JFBen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Fish Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectClimate changeen_HK
dc.subjectDamsen_HK
dc.subjectFlow alterationen_HK
dc.subjectMekongen_HK
dc.subjectOverfishingen_HK
dc.subjectYangtzeen_HK
dc.subject.meshClimate Change-
dc.subject.meshConservation of Natural Resources-
dc.subject.meshPower Plants-
dc.subject.meshRivers-
dc.subject.meshWater Pollution-
dc.titleAsian river fishes in the Anthropocene: Threats and conservation challenges in an era of rapid environmental changeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1095-8649.2011.03086.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22136237-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82955237623en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199552en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82955237623&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume79en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1487en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1524en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298013900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_HK

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