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Article: The possible benefits of reduced errors in the motor skills acquisition of children
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TitleThe possible benefits of reduced errors in the motor skills acquisition of children
 
AuthorsCapio, CM1 4
Sit, CHP1 3
Abernethy, B1 2
Masters, RSW1
 
KeywordsChildren
Motor learning
Rehabilitation
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.smarttjournal.com
 
CitationSports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy And Technology, 2012, v. 4, article no. 1 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1758-2555-4-1
 
AbstractAn implicit approach to motor learning suggests that relatively complex movement skills may be better acquired in environments that constrain errors during the initial stages of practice. This current concept paper proposes that reducing the number of errors committed during motor learning leads to stable performance when attention demands are increased by concurrent cognitive tasks. While it appears that this approach to practice may be beneficial for motor learning, further studies are needed to both confirm this advantage and better understand the underlying mechanisms. An approach involving error minimization during early learning may have important applications in paediatric rehabilitation. © 2012 Capio et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
ISSN1758-2555
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.595
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1758-2555-4-1
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3275454
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCapio, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHP
 
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, B
 
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSW
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:50:34Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:50:34Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractAn implicit approach to motor learning suggests that relatively complex movement skills may be better acquired in environments that constrain errors during the initial stages of practice. This current concept paper proposes that reducing the number of errors committed during motor learning leads to stable performance when attention demands are increased by concurrent cognitive tasks. While it appears that this approach to practice may be beneficial for motor learning, further studies are needed to both confirm this advantage and better understand the underlying mechanisms. An approach involving error minimization during early learning may have important applications in paediatric rehabilitation. © 2012 Capio et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationSports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy And Technology, 2012, v. 4, article no. 1 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1758-2555-4-1
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1758-2555-4-1
 
dc.identifier.hkuros199618
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198728
 
dc.identifier.hkuros230007
 
dc.identifier.issn1758-2555
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.595
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3275454
 
dc.identifier.pmid22230189
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856692769
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146929
 
dc.identifier.volume4
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.smarttjournal.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofSports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy and Technology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.rightsSports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy and Technology. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.subjectChildren
 
dc.subjectMotor learning
 
dc.subjectRehabilitation
 
dc.titleThe possible benefits of reduced errors in the motor skills acquisition of children
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. School of Human Movement Studies
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong
  4. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven