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Article: Early childhood curriculum reform in China: Perspectives from examining teachers' beliefs and practices in Chinese literacy teaching

TitleEarly childhood curriculum reform in China: Perspectives from examining teachers' beliefs and practices in Chinese literacy teaching
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherM.E. Sharpe, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mesharpe.com/mall/results1.asp?acr=ced
Citation
Chinese Education And Society, 2011, v. 44 n. 6, p. 5-23 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo waves of reform have been conducted in China since the 1980s to transform its early childhood curriculum into a Western-style, progressive model. Western curricula and programs such as the Montessori method, the project approach, the Reggio Emilia method, and the high/scope method have been imported and adopted all over the country. But the top-down reforms and these "imported" ideas have been challenged by scholars and practitioners. Aiming to understand how practices in kindergartens measure up with the reform objectives, the present study investigated the teachers' beliefs and practices in five Shenzhen kindergartens' literacy instruction.Altogether, ten early childhood classrooms were observed for one school week, and the ten classroom teachers were interviewed about the observed Chinese teaching practices. The teachers and teaching assistants of the ten classes (N = 20) were also surveyed about their teaching beliefs and practices. The results indicated a remarkable belief-practice gap as well as a policy-practice gap. Most of the curriculum reform ideas were expressed by the teachers in their self-reported beliefs but had not been implemented in their teaching practice. The traditional Chinese model with the teacher directing the whole-class session was still dominating. Slight differences were also found among the ten classes, which reflect the cascading effects of curriculum reform. These findings suggest that curriculum reforms should take into consideration the culture, language, teachers, parents, resources available, and the prevailing education system. © 2011 M.E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146918
ISSN
2009 Impact Factor: 0.131
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.115
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:49:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:49:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChinese Education And Society, 2011, v. 44 n. 6, p. 5-23en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1061-1932en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146918-
dc.description.abstractTwo waves of reform have been conducted in China since the 1980s to transform its early childhood curriculum into a Western-style, progressive model. Western curricula and programs such as the Montessori method, the project approach, the Reggio Emilia method, and the high/scope method have been imported and adopted all over the country. But the top-down reforms and these "imported" ideas have been challenged by scholars and practitioners. Aiming to understand how practices in kindergartens measure up with the reform objectives, the present study investigated the teachers' beliefs and practices in five Shenzhen kindergartens' literacy instruction.Altogether, ten early childhood classrooms were observed for one school week, and the ten classroom teachers were interviewed about the observed Chinese teaching practices. The teachers and teaching assistants of the ten classes (N = 20) were also surveyed about their teaching beliefs and practices. The results indicated a remarkable belief-practice gap as well as a policy-practice gap. Most of the curriculum reform ideas were expressed by the teachers in their self-reported beliefs but had not been implemented in their teaching practice. The traditional Chinese model with the teacher directing the whole-class session was still dominating. Slight differences were also found among the ten classes, which reflect the cascading effects of curriculum reform. These findings suggest that curriculum reforms should take into consideration the culture, language, teachers, parents, resources available, and the prevailing education system. © 2011 M.E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherM.E. Sharpe, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mesharpe.com/mall/results1.asp?acr=ceden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Education and Societyen_HK
dc.titleEarly childhood curriculum reform in China: Perspectives from examining teachers' beliefs and practices in Chinese literacy teachingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, H: huili@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, H=rp00926en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2753/CED1061-1932440601en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84555208590en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199829en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84555208590&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume44en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage5en_HK
dc.identifier.epage23en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, H=35220135900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, X=37084694400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, J=35220655100en_HK

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