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Article: From small to big molecules: how do we prevent and delay the progression of age-related neurodegeneration?

TitleFrom small to big molecules: how do we prevent and delay the progression of age-related neurodegeneration?
Authors
KeywordsAge-Related Macular Degeneration
Alzheimer's Disease
Flavonoids
Glycoconjugates
Parkinson's Disease
Resveratrol
Stilbenes
Issue Date2012
PublisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cpd/index.htm
Citation
Current Pharmaceutical Design, 2012, v. 18 n. 1, p. 15-26 How to Cite?
AbstractAge-related neurodegeneration in the brain and retina is complicated. It comprises a series of events encompassing different modes of degeneration in neurons, as well as inflammation mediated by glial cells. Systemic inflammation and risk factors can contribute to disease progression. Age-related conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) affect patients for 5 to 20 years and are highly associated with risk factors such as hyperhomocysteinaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, and symptoms of mood disorder. The long duration of the degeneration and the wide array of systemic factors provide the opportunity for nutraceutical intervention to prevent or delay disease progression. Small molecules such as phenolic compounds are candidates for neuroprotection because they have anti-oxidant activities and can modulate intracellular signaling pathways. Bigger entities such as oligosaccharides and polysaccharides have often been neglected because of their complex structure. However, certain big molecules can provide neuroprotective effects. They may also have a wide spectrum of action against risk factors. In this review we use an integrative approach to the potential uses of nutraceutical products to prevent age-related neurodegeneration. These include direct effects of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides on neurons to antagonize various neurodegenerative mechanisms in AD, PD and AMD, and indirect effects of these compounds on peripheral disease-related risk factors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146851
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.052
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.220
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, YSen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, CHDen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, TFen_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:42:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:42:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Pharmaceutical Design, 2012, v. 18 n. 1, p. 15-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn1381-6128-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146851-
dc.description.abstractAge-related neurodegeneration in the brain and retina is complicated. It comprises a series of events encompassing different modes of degeneration in neurons, as well as inflammation mediated by glial cells. Systemic inflammation and risk factors can contribute to disease progression. Age-related conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) affect patients for 5 to 20 years and are highly associated with risk factors such as hyperhomocysteinaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, and symptoms of mood disorder. The long duration of the degeneration and the wide array of systemic factors provide the opportunity for nutraceutical intervention to prevent or delay disease progression. Small molecules such as phenolic compounds are candidates for neuroprotection because they have anti-oxidant activities and can modulate intracellular signaling pathways. Bigger entities such as oligosaccharides and polysaccharides have often been neglected because of their complex structure. However, certain big molecules can provide neuroprotective effects. They may also have a wide spectrum of action against risk factors. In this review we use an integrative approach to the potential uses of nutraceutical products to prevent age-related neurodegeneration. These include direct effects of phenolic compounds and polysaccharides on neurons to antagonize various neurodegenerative mechanisms in AD, PD and AMD, and indirect effects of these compounds on peripheral disease-related risk factors.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cpd/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Pharmaceutical Designen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAge-Related Macular Degeneration-
dc.subjectAlzheimer's Disease-
dc.subjectFlavonoids-
dc.subjectGlycoconjugates-
dc.subjectParkinson's Disease-
dc.subjectResveratrol-
dc.subjectStilbenes-
dc.subject.meshAging-
dc.subject.meshAlzheimer Disease - physiopathology - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplements-
dc.subject.meshNeurodegenerative Diseases - physiopathology - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshNeurons - drug effects - pathology-
dc.titleFrom small to big molecules: how do we prevent and delay the progression of age-related neurodegeneration?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, YS: janiceys@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, TF: vtfchan3@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/138161212798919039-
dc.identifier.pmid22211681-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855827849-
dc.identifier.hkuros199709en_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage15en_US
dc.identifier.epage26en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300284200004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, YS=14031513600-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, DCH=54895118400-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TF=37118537600-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, RCC=7403713410-

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