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Article: Preimplantation antagonism of adrenomedullin action compromises fetoplacental development and reduces litter size
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TitlePreimplantation antagonism of adrenomedullin action compromises fetoplacental development and reduces litter size
 
AuthorsLi, L1 2
Tang, F1
O, WS1
 
KeywordsAdrenomedullin
Female infertility
Fetal development
Fetal resorption
Implantation
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/theriogenology
 
CitationTheriogenology, 2012, v. 77 n. 9, p. 1846-1853 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2011.12.030
 
AbstractConcentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM) in circulation, the uterus, and corpora lutea (CL) increase during pregnancy. We previously reported a temporal-spatial pattern of ADM level and gene expression of Adm and its receptor components, from early pregnancy through midpregnancy to late pregnancy in rats. Two earlier reports using an in vivo model of ADM antagonism demonstrated the important roles of ADM in the post-implantation period. Treatment with ADM receptor blocker hADM22-52 starting from gestation Day 8 or Day 14 resulted in fetal-placental growth restriction and reduction in litter size. In this study, the endogenous ADM actions were abolished in the preimplantation period by infusing the antagonist for the ADM receptor (hADM22-52) with the osmotic (Alzet) pump from Days 1-4 of pregnancy. We inferred that ADM, acting through the ADM receptor, had critical roles during preimplantation, as brief inhibition of ADM action by hADM22-52 during this period reduced litter size by restricting placental growth and increasing fetal resorption in midpregnancy. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
 
ISSN0093-691X
2013 Impact Factor: 1.845
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.059
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2011.12.030
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000304231600013
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grant Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaHKU 7736/07M
Funding Information:

This study was substantially supported by a grant from the Research Grant Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (HKU 7736/07M).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, L
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, F
 
dc.contributor.authorO, WS
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T05:42:29Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-23T05:42:29Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractConcentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM) in circulation, the uterus, and corpora lutea (CL) increase during pregnancy. We previously reported a temporal-spatial pattern of ADM level and gene expression of Adm and its receptor components, from early pregnancy through midpregnancy to late pregnancy in rats. Two earlier reports using an in vivo model of ADM antagonism demonstrated the important roles of ADM in the post-implantation period. Treatment with ADM receptor blocker hADM22-52 starting from gestation Day 8 or Day 14 resulted in fetal-placental growth restriction and reduction in litter size. In this study, the endogenous ADM actions were abolished in the preimplantation period by infusing the antagonist for the ADM receptor (hADM22-52) with the osmotic (Alzet) pump from Days 1-4 of pregnancy. We inferred that ADM, acting through the ADM receptor, had critical roles during preimplantation, as brief inhibition of ADM action by hADM22-52 during this period reduced litter size by restricting placental growth and increasing fetal resorption in midpregnancy. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationTheriogenology, 2012, v. 77 n. 9, p. 1846-1853 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2011.12.030
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10399065
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2011.12.030
 
dc.identifier.epage1853
 
dc.identifier.hkuros199648
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304231600013
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grant Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaHKU 7736/07M
Funding Information:

This study was substantially supported by a grant from the Research Grant Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (HKU 7736/07M).

 
dc.identifier.issn0093-691X
2013 Impact Factor: 1.845
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.059
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.pmid22365702
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860475603
 
dc.identifier.spage1846
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146843
 
dc.identifier.volume77
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/theriogenology
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofTheriogenology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectAdrenomedullin
 
dc.subjectFemale infertility
 
dc.subjectFetal development
 
dc.subjectFetal resorption
 
dc.subjectImplantation
 
dc.titlePreimplantation antagonism of adrenomedullin action compromises fetoplacental development and reduces litter size
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Chinese Academy of Sciences