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Article: Language policy, 'Asia's world city' and anglophone Hong Kong writing

TitleLanguage policy, 'Asia's world city' and anglophone Hong Kong writing
Authors
KeywordsAsia
Hong Kong
language and literacy
literature
transnationalism
Issue Date2010
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369801X.asp
Citation
Interventions, 2010, v. 12 n. 3, p. 428-441 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong's official language policy of 'biliteracy' (Chinese and English) and 'trilingualism' (Cantonese, Putonghua, English), announced after the reversion to China in 1997, claims to address actualities of language use in the territory, remove inequities between English and Chinese, and consolidate the linguistic platform to launch Hong Kong as 'Asia's World City'. Public discussion of and controversy over this policy immediately followed, and have continued in the past decade. But they have tended to focus on the implementation of the policy in education, specifically the medium of instruction in schools, to the exclusion of most other areas of language use. Drawing on recent examples of translingual practice in literary writing, this essay argues first that such actually existing practices are far more verbally nuanced, self-knowing and self-reflexive than the official policy would allow, and second, that they instantiate Hong Kong's identity as 'Asian', which challenges both the official and public focus on Chinese and English. The 'world' and 'world city' that emerge from such writing are historically located in the transition before and after 1997, when the writers acquired their languages in schools. They are also provisional, generated by a poeisis of experimentation that attends to cultural change as language change in - and as - everyday life. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146812
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.31
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.130
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, EYLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-22T04:53:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-22T04:53:57Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInterventions, 2010, v. 12 n. 3, p. 428-441en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1369-801Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146812-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong's official language policy of 'biliteracy' (Chinese and English) and 'trilingualism' (Cantonese, Putonghua, English), announced after the reversion to China in 1997, claims to address actualities of language use in the territory, remove inequities between English and Chinese, and consolidate the linguistic platform to launch Hong Kong as 'Asia's World City'. Public discussion of and controversy over this policy immediately followed, and have continued in the past decade. But they have tended to focus on the implementation of the policy in education, specifically the medium of instruction in schools, to the exclusion of most other areas of language use. Drawing on recent examples of translingual practice in literary writing, this essay argues first that such actually existing practices are far more verbally nuanced, self-knowing and self-reflexive than the official policy would allow, and second, that they instantiate Hong Kong's identity as 'Asian', which challenges both the official and public focus on Chinese and English. The 'world' and 'world city' that emerge from such writing are historically located in the transition before and after 1997, when the writers acquired their languages in schools. They are also provisional, generated by a poeisis of experimentation that attends to cultural change as language change in - and as - everyday life. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1369801X.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInterventionsen_HK
dc.rightsThis is an electronic version of an article published in Interventions, 2010, v. 12 n. 3, p. 428-441. Interventions is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAsiaen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectlanguage and literacyen_HK
dc.subjectliteratureen_HK
dc.subjecttransnationalismen_HK
dc.titleLanguage policy, 'Asia's world city' and anglophone Hong Kong writingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, EYL: eylho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, EYL=rp01162en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1369801X.2010.516100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957853572en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79957853572&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume12en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage428en_HK
dc.identifier.epage441en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290308700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, EYL=26034000200en_HK

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