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Article: Premature birth and age at onset of puberty

TitlePremature birth and age at onset of puberty
Authors
KeywordsBirth
Body height
Body mass
Gestational age
Major clinical study
Issue Date2012
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 3, p. 415-422 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Premature birth is associated with poor metabolic health in both sexes, potentially via earlier pubertal timing. METHODS: We examined the associations of gestational age and premature birth (<37 weeks gestation) with age at onset of puberty (Tanner stage II for breast or genitalia development). We used interval-censored survival analyses in 3963 boys and 3403 girls (93% follow-up) in a population-representative Chinese birth cohort, "Children of 1997," comprising 88% of births in Hong Kong in April and May 1997. We also examined whether the associations varied with sex or with height or body mass index (BMI) at 7 years. RESULTS: Premature girls reached puberty about 4 months later than girls with ≥41 weeks' gestation (time ratio = 1.04 [95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.06]), adjusted for mother' age of menarche, mother's place of birth, and smoking during pregnancy. Gestational age was not associated with onset of puberty in boys (test for interaction by sex, P < 0.01). None of these associations was altered by adjustment for socioeconomic position or varied with childhood height or BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Premature birth was not related to earlier onset of puberty; instead, premature girls had later onset of puberty. Thus, the association between premature birth and subsequent cardiovascular risk is probably not mediated through the timing of pubertal onset. It is unclear whether onset, duration, or tempo of puberty is more relevant to the detrimental consequences of early puberty. Further studies investigating intrauterine, infant, and childhood influences on the duration and tempo of puberty may help unravel the early origins of cardiovascular diseases. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146806
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health Care and Promotion Fund
Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of Hong Kong [HCPF]216106
HHSRF03040771
07080751
Funding Information:

This work is a sub-study of the "Children of 1997" birth cohort, which was initially supported by the Health Care and Promotion Fund, Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of Hong Kong [HCPF Grant # 216106] and re-established in 2005 funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund [HHSRF Grants # 03040771]. This sub-study was funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund [HHSRF grants # 07080751]. The authors reported no other financial interests related to this research.

References
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-21T07:58:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-21T07:58:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 3, p. 415-422en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146806-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Premature birth is associated with poor metabolic health in both sexes, potentially via earlier pubertal timing. METHODS: We examined the associations of gestational age and premature birth (<37 weeks gestation) with age at onset of puberty (Tanner stage II for breast or genitalia development). We used interval-censored survival analyses in 3963 boys and 3403 girls (93% follow-up) in a population-representative Chinese birth cohort, "Children of 1997," comprising 88% of births in Hong Kong in April and May 1997. We also examined whether the associations varied with sex or with height or body mass index (BMI) at 7 years. RESULTS: Premature girls reached puberty about 4 months later than girls with ≥41 weeks' gestation (time ratio = 1.04 [95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.06]), adjusted for mother' age of menarche, mother's place of birth, and smoking during pregnancy. Gestational age was not associated with onset of puberty in boys (test for interaction by sex, P < 0.01). None of these associations was altered by adjustment for socioeconomic position or varied with childhood height or BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Premature birth was not related to earlier onset of puberty; instead, premature girls had later onset of puberty. Thus, the association between premature birth and subsequent cardiovascular risk is probably not mediated through the timing of pubertal onset. It is unclear whether onset, duration, or tempo of puberty is more relevant to the detrimental consequences of early puberty. Further studies investigating intrauterine, infant, and childhood influences on the duration and tempo of puberty may help unravel the early origins of cardiovascular diseases. © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectBirth-
dc.subjectBody height-
dc.subjectBody mass-
dc.subjectGestational age-
dc.subjectMajor clinical study-
dc.titlePremature birth and age at onset of pubertyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EDE.0b013e31824d5fd0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22450693-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859631275en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199503-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859631275&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage415en_HK
dc.identifier.epage422en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302783700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectShort- and medium-term outcomes of accelerated infant growth in Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort-
dc.relation.projectDoes infant or childhood obesity lead to adolescent depression?-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK

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