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Article: Effect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strength

TitleEffect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strength
Authors
KeywordsBond strength
Collagen cross-linking
Dentine
Proanthocyanidin
Resin
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdent
Citation
Journal Of Dentistry, 2012, v. 40 n. 3, p. 173-180 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: This study evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidin (PA) incorporation into experimental dental adhesives on resin-dentine bond strength. Methods: Four experimental hydrophilic adhesives containing different PA concentrations were prepared by combining 50 wt% resin comonomer mixtures with 50 wt% ethanol. Proanthocyanidin was added to the ethanol-solvated resin to yield three adhesives with PA concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 wt%, respectively. A PA-free adhesive served as the control. Flat dentine surfaces from 40 extracted third molars were etched with 32% phosphoric acid. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four adhesive groups. Two layers of one of the four experimental adhesives were applied to the etched dentine and light-cured for 20 s. Composite build-ups were performed using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). After storage in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h, twenty-four bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure under tension for bond strength testing. Bond strength data were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Interfacial nanoleakage was examined in the remaining teeth using a field-emission scanning electron microscope and analysed using the Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: No significant difference in bond strength was found amongst PA-free, 1% and 2% PA adhesives. However, incorporation of 3% PA into the adhesive significantly lowered bond strength as demonstrated by a greater number of adhesive failures and more extensive nanoleakage along the bonded interface. Conclusion: Incorporation of 2% proanthocyanidin into dental adhesives has no adverse effect on dentine bond strength. Clinical significance: The addition of proanthocyanidin to an experimental adhesive has no adverse effect on the immediate resin-dentine bond strength when the concentration of proanthocyanidin in the adhesive is less than or equal to 2%. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146800
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.109
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.029
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Bisco Inc.
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong201011159189
Funding Information:

The comonomer blend used in this study was generously sponsored by Bisco Inc. This work was supported by Grant 201011159189, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEpasinghe, DJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYiu, CKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, MFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTay, FRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKing, NMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-15T03:43:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-15T03:43:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Dentistry, 2012, v. 40 n. 3, p. 173-180en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-5712en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146800-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: This study evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidin (PA) incorporation into experimental dental adhesives on resin-dentine bond strength. Methods: Four experimental hydrophilic adhesives containing different PA concentrations were prepared by combining 50 wt% resin comonomer mixtures with 50 wt% ethanol. Proanthocyanidin was added to the ethanol-solvated resin to yield three adhesives with PA concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 wt%, respectively. A PA-free adhesive served as the control. Flat dentine surfaces from 40 extracted third molars were etched with 32% phosphoric acid. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four adhesive groups. Two layers of one of the four experimental adhesives were applied to the etched dentine and light-cured for 20 s. Composite build-ups were performed using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). After storage in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h, twenty-four bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure under tension for bond strength testing. Bond strength data were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Interfacial nanoleakage was examined in the remaining teeth using a field-emission scanning electron microscope and analysed using the Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: No significant difference in bond strength was found amongst PA-free, 1% and 2% PA adhesives. However, incorporation of 3% PA into the adhesive significantly lowered bond strength as demonstrated by a greater number of adhesive failures and more extensive nanoleakage along the bonded interface. Conclusion: Incorporation of 2% proanthocyanidin into dental adhesives has no adverse effect on dentine bond strength. Clinical significance: The addition of proanthocyanidin to an experimental adhesive has no adverse effect on the immediate resin-dentine bond strength when the concentration of proanthocyanidin in the adhesive is less than or equal to 2%. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdenten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dentistryen_HK
dc.subjectBond strengthen_HK
dc.subjectCollagen cross-linkingen_HK
dc.subjectDentineen_HK
dc.subjectProanthocyanidinen_HK
dc.subjectResinen_HK
dc.titleEffect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strengthen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYiu, CKY: ckyyiu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailBurrow, MF: mfburr58@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKing, NM: hhdbknm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, CKY=rp00018en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBurrow, MF=rp01306en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKing, NM=rp00006en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jdent.2011.11.013en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22155037-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857059935en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199522-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857059935&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage173en_HK
dc.identifier.epage180en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1879-176X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300612000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEpasinghe, DJ=54893137900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, CKY=7007115156en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurrow, MF=7005876730en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTay, FR=7102091962en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKing, NM=7201762850en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10121194-

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