Article: Tissue tropism of swine influenza viruses and reassortants in ex vivo cultures of the human respiratory tract and conjunctiva

TitleTissue tropism of swine influenza viruses and reassortants in ex vivo cultures of the human respiratory tract and conjunctiva
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 22, p. 11581-11587 How to Cite?
Abstract
The 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus was generated by reassortment of swine influenza viruses of different lineages. This was the first influenza pandemic to emerge in over 4 decades and the first to occur after the realization that influenza pandemics arise from influenza viruses of animals. In order to understand the biological determinants of pandemic emergence, it is relevant to compare the tropism of different lineages of swine influenza viruses and reassortants derived from them with that of 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses in ex vivo cultures of the human nasopharynx, bronchus, alveoli, and conjunctiva. We hypothesized that virus which can transmit efficiently between humans replicated well in the human upper airways. As previously reported, H1N1pdm and seasonal H1N1 viruses replicated efficiently in the nasopharyngeal, bronchial, and alveolar epithelium. In contrast, representative viruses from the classical swine (CS) (H1N1) lineage could not infect human respiratory epithelium; Eurasian avian-like swine (EA) (H1N1) viruses only infected alveolar epithelium and North American triple-reassortant (TRIG) viruses only infected the bronchial epithelium albeit inefficiently. Interestingly, a naturally occurring triple-reassortant swine virus, A/SW/HK/915/04 (H1N2), with a matrix gene segment of EA swine derivation (i.e., differing from H1N1pdm only in lacking a neuraminidase [NA] gene of EA derivation) readily infected and replicated in human nasopharyngeal and bronchial epithelia but not in the lung. A recombinant sw915 with the NA from H1N1pdm retained its tropism for the bronchus and acquired additional replication competence for alveolar epithelium. In contrast to H1N1pdm, none of the swine viruses tested nor seasonal H1N1 had tropism in human conjunctiva. Recombinant viruses generated by swapping the surface proteins (hemagglutinin and NA) of H1N1pdm and seasonal H1N1 virus demonstrated that these two gene segments together are key determinants of conjunctival tropism. Overall, these findings suggest that ex vivo cultures of the human respiratory tract provide a useful biological model for assessing the human health risk of swine influenza viruses. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146789
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 4.648
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
commissioned study
RFCID10090202
10091132
Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government
General Research FundHKU 7612/08
Research Grants Council, Hong Kong SAR Government
National Institutes of Health (NIAID )HHSN266200700005C
University Grants Committee, Hong Kong SAR GovernmentAoE/M-12/06
European CommissionFP7-GA258084
Funding Information:

We acknowledge financial support by a commissioned study (to J.S.M.P.) and RFCID grants (reference numbers 10090202 and 10091132 to J.M.N. and R.W.Y.C., respectively) by the Research Fund for Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government, and the General Research Fund (HKU 7612/08 M to M.C.W. C.), Research Grants Council, Hong Kong SAR Government; the National Institutes of Health (NIAID contract HHSN266200700005C); and AoE Funding (AoE/M-12/06) from the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee, Hong Kong SAR Government. Additional funding was provided by a grant from the European Commission (FP7-GA258084).

References
Grants

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong
  2. HKU-Pasteur Research Centre
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RWYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKang, SSRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYen, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, ACLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, LLSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, WCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, IWWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, DDYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, WWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, DLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSihoe, ADLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, MCWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-10T09:16:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-10T09:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 22, p. 11581-11587en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146789-
dc.description.abstractThe 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus was generated by reassortment of swine influenza viruses of different lineages. This was the first influenza pandemic to emerge in over 4 decades and the first to occur after the realization that influenza pandemics arise from influenza viruses of animals. In order to understand the biological determinants of pandemic emergence, it is relevant to compare the tropism of different lineages of swine influenza viruses and reassortants derived from them with that of 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses in ex vivo cultures of the human nasopharynx, bronchus, alveoli, and conjunctiva. We hypothesized that virus which can transmit efficiently between humans replicated well in the human upper airways. As previously reported, H1N1pdm and seasonal H1N1 viruses replicated efficiently in the nasopharyngeal, bronchial, and alveolar epithelium. In contrast, representative viruses from the classical swine (CS) (H1N1) lineage could not infect human respiratory epithelium; Eurasian avian-like swine (EA) (H1N1) viruses only infected alveolar epithelium and North American triple-reassortant (TRIG) viruses only infected the bronchial epithelium albeit inefficiently. Interestingly, a naturally occurring triple-reassortant swine virus, A/SW/HK/915/04 (H1N2), with a matrix gene segment of EA swine derivation (i.e., differing from H1N1pdm only in lacking a neuraminidase [NA] gene of EA derivation) readily infected and replicated in human nasopharyngeal and bronchial epithelia but not in the lung. A recombinant sw915 with the NA from H1N1pdm retained its tropism for the bronchus and acquired additional replication competence for alveolar epithelium. In contrast to H1N1pdm, none of the swine viruses tested nor seasonal H1N1 had tropism in human conjunctiva. Recombinant viruses generated by swapping the surface proteins (hemagglutinin and NA) of H1N1pdm and seasonal H1N1 virus demonstrated that these two gene segments together are key determinants of conjunctival tropism. Overall, these findings suggest that ex vivo cultures of the human respiratory tract provide a useful biological model for assessing the human health risk of swine influenza viruses. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshConjunctiva - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype - Genetics - Growth & Development - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1n2 Subtype - Genetics - Growth & Development - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshOrgan Culture Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshReassortant Viruses - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Mucosa - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSwineen_US
dc.subject.meshViral Tropismen_US
dc.subject.meshVirulenceen_US
dc.titleTissue tropism of swine influenza viruses and reassortants in ex vivo cultures of the human respiratory tract and conjunctivaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, RWY: reneewy@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYen, HL: hyen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, WW: wicolai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, MCW: mchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, RWY=rp01596en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYen, HL=rp00304en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, WW=rp00531en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, MCW=rp00420en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.05662-11en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21880750en_HK
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3209323-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80655143499en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros202478-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80655143499&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume85en_HK
dc.identifier.issue22en_HK
dc.identifier.spage11581en_HK
dc.identifier.epage11587en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1098-5514-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296422700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectPrevention and treatment of swine origin influenza virus (S-OIV) though the use of interferon - an in vivo and ex vivo study-
dc.relation.projectThe biological and genetic determinants of seasonal influenza A virus replication in the lower respiratory tract-
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, RWY=26661379100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKang, SSR=36925308900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYen, HL=7102476668en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ACL=54420436700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, LLS=36999571500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, WCL=26324133100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KM=35301205900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, IWW=54419539300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DDY=50662409700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, WW=7402231098en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, DLW=54890371000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSihoe, ADL=6603611976en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, LLM=7005441747en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNicholls, JM=7201463077en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, MCW=26654715500en_HK

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