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Article: Peer collaboration and discourse patterns in learning from incompatible information

TitlePeer collaboration and discourse patterns in learning from incompatible information
Authors
KeywordsConceptual change
Discourse
Knowledge construction
Peer collaboration
Issue Date2001
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0020-4277
Citation
Instructional Science, 2001, v. 29 n. 6, p. 443-479 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated the effects of peer collaboration and discourse patterns on conceptual change in the context of high-school students learning from incompatible scientific information. The domain of investigation was biological evolution. Participants included 108 students from Grades 9 and 12 randomly assigned to four conditions: (1) peer-conflict; (2) individual-conflict; (3) peer-assimilation and (4) individual-assimilation. Students were asked to think aloud or discuss with their peers eight statements consisting of scientific information ordered in ways that either maximized or minimized conflict. Several measures of prior knowledge and conceptual change were obtained. Peer collaboration resulted in some mixed findings suggesting that peer effects may vary depending on collaborative interactions. In-depth analyses of collaborative interactions indicated two discourse patterns: 'surface' moves included rating, ignoring, rejecting, and patching to eliminate differences; 'problem-centred' moves involved problem recognition, formulation of questions, and construction of explanations. Comparisons between successful and unsuccessful learners showed significant differences in their proportional use of surface and problem-centred moves. External conflict did not lead to deeper discourse and more conceptual change; students may need to experience meaningful conflict. These findings suggest why peer collaboration only works sometimes and indicate the importance of helping students to engage in productive discourse.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146644
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.462
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.418
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-09T03:21:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-09T03:21:09Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInstructional Science, 2001, v. 29 n. 6, p. 443-479en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-4277en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146644-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the effects of peer collaboration and discourse patterns on conceptual change in the context of high-school students learning from incompatible scientific information. The domain of investigation was biological evolution. Participants included 108 students from Grades 9 and 12 randomly assigned to four conditions: (1) peer-conflict; (2) individual-conflict; (3) peer-assimilation and (4) individual-assimilation. Students were asked to think aloud or discuss with their peers eight statements consisting of scientific information ordered in ways that either maximized or minimized conflict. Several measures of prior knowledge and conceptual change were obtained. Peer collaboration resulted in some mixed findings suggesting that peer effects may vary depending on collaborative interactions. In-depth analyses of collaborative interactions indicated two discourse patterns: 'surface' moves included rating, ignoring, rejecting, and patching to eliminate differences; 'problem-centred' moves involved problem recognition, formulation of questions, and construction of explanations. Comparisons between successful and unsuccessful learners showed significant differences in their proportional use of surface and problem-centred moves. External conflict did not lead to deeper discourse and more conceptual change; students may need to experience meaningful conflict. These findings suggest why peer collaboration only works sometimes and indicate the importance of helping students to engage in productive discourse.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0020-4277en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInstructional Scienceen_HK
dc.subjectConceptual changeen_HK
dc.subjectDiscourseen_HK
dc.subjectKnowledge constructionen_HK
dc.subjectPeer collaborationen_HK
dc.titlePeer collaboration and discourse patterns in learning from incompatible informationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CKK: ckkchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CKK=rp00891en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1012099909179en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035634755en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035634755&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage443en_HK
dc.identifier.epage479en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000171662800001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CKK=27170802100en_HK

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