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Article: Folkbiology meets microbiology: A study of conceptual and behavioral change

TitleFolkbiology meets microbiology: A study of conceptual and behavioral change
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral change
Biology
Causal mechanism
Coherence
Colds
Conceptual change
Folkbiology
Germs
Infectious disease
Knowledge enrichment
Issue Date2008
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogpsych
Citation
Cognitive Psychology, 2008, v. 57 n. 1, p. 1-19 How to Cite?
AbstractHealth education can offer a valuable window onto conceptual and behavioral change. In Study 1, we mapped out 3rd-grade Chinese children's beliefs about causes of colds and flu and ways they can be prevented. We also explored older adults' beliefs as a possible source of the children's ideas. In Study 2, we gave 3rd- and 4th-grade Chinese children either a conventional cold/flu education program or an experimental "Think Biology" program that focused on a biological causal mechanism for cold/flu transmission. The "Think Biology" program led children to reason about cold/flu causation and prevention more scientifically than the conventional program, and their reasoning abilities dovetailed with their mastery of the causal mechanism. Study 3, a modified replication of Study 2, found useful behavioral change as well as conceptual change among children who received the "Think Biology" program and documented coherence among knowledge enrichment, conceptual change, and behavioral change. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146641
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.537
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.356
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAu, TKFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MWLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, JYSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, GWMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-09T03:21:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-09T03:21:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCognitive Psychology, 2008, v. 57 n. 1, p. 1-19en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0010-0285en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146641-
dc.description.abstractHealth education can offer a valuable window onto conceptual and behavioral change. In Study 1, we mapped out 3rd-grade Chinese children's beliefs about causes of colds and flu and ways they can be prevented. We also explored older adults' beliefs as a possible source of the children's ideas. In Study 2, we gave 3rd- and 4th-grade Chinese children either a conventional cold/flu education program or an experimental "Think Biology" program that focused on a biological causal mechanism for cold/flu transmission. The "Think Biology" program led children to reason about cold/flu causation and prevention more scientifically than the conventional program, and their reasoning abilities dovetailed with their mastery of the causal mechanism. Study 3, a modified replication of Study 2, found useful behavioral change as well as conceptual change among children who received the "Think Biology" program and documented coherence among knowledge enrichment, conceptual change, and behavioral change. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogpsychen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive Psychologyen_HK
dc.subjectBehavioral changeen_HK
dc.subjectBiologyen_HK
dc.subjectCausal mechanismen_HK
dc.subjectCoherenceen_HK
dc.subjectColdsen_HK
dc.subjectConceptual changeen_HK
dc.subjectFolkbiologyen_HK
dc.subjectGermsen_HK
dc.subjectInfectious diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectKnowledge enrichmenten_HK
dc.titleFolkbiology meets microbiology: A study of conceptual and behavioral changeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, TKf: terryau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CKK: ckkchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, TKf=rp00580en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CKK=rp00891en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cogpsych.2008.03.002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18457822-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-45449099239en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros144222-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-45449099239&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage19en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257869500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu, TKf=9435174900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CKK=27170802100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, Tk=24166486100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, MWL=7201897549en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, JYS=24166143500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, GWM=36921609300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5322334-

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