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Book Chapter: Bilingual education in Hong Kong

TitleBilingual education in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherKluwer Academic Publishers
Citation
Bilingual education in Hong Kong. In Cummins J and Corson, D (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Language and Education: Volume 5: Bilingual Education, v. 5, p. 281-289. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong exemplifies a special case in which the notions of `bilingual education' and `dominant language background' take on non-conventional meanings. First, only the immersion approach to bilingual education is officially accepted and bilingual classroom practices have been discouraged by the Hong Kong government as educationally unsound (Education Commission 1990, 1994, 1995). Government policies notwithstanding, Cantonese-English bilingual classroom practices are prevalent, albeit officially illegitimate, in what are nominally English medium secondary schools/universities. Second, although Cantonese is the mother tongue and the dominant, daily life, language of the majority of people in Hong Kong, English is the politically and socioeconomically dominant language.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146518
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, AMY-
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T08:23:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T08:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationBilingual education in Hong Kong. In Cummins J and Corson, D (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Language and Education: Volume 5: Bilingual Education, v. 5, p. 281-289. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997-
dc.identifier.isbn0-7923-4596-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146518-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong exemplifies a special case in which the notions of `bilingual education' and `dominant language background' take on non-conventional meanings. First, only the immersion approach to bilingual education is officially accepted and bilingual classroom practices have been discouraged by the Hong Kong government as educationally unsound (Education Commission 1990, 1994, 1995). Government policies notwithstanding, Cantonese-English bilingual classroom practices are prevalent, albeit officially illegitimate, in what are nominally English medium secondary schools/universities. Second, although Cantonese is the mother tongue and the dominant, daily life, language of the majority of people in Hong Kong, English is the politically and socioeconomically dominant language.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishers-
dc.relation.ispartofEncyclopedia of Language and Education: Volume 5: Bilingual Education-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleBilingual education in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLin, AMY: angellin@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.volume5-
dc.identifier.spage281-
dc.identifier.epage289-
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht, The Netherlands-

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