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Conference Paper: The medicalization of deviance in China

TitleThe medicalization of deviance in China
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe Asian Criminological Society (ACS).
Citation
The 3rd Annual International Conference of the Asian Criminological Society (ACS), Taipei, Taiwan, 16-19 December 2011. In Conference Proceedings, 2011, p. 152-166 How to Cite?
AbstractConrad and Schneider’s now classical work on the historical transformation of definitions of deviance from “badness” to “sickness” is relevant for the situation in China today, although with some modifications. The weakly founded medical/psychiatric profession and the strong political/ideological discourse in China leads to a strange combination of medicalization and moralization, even criminalization of deviance. The “sick” is often combined with the “bad”, and “sickness” is often seen as a secondary sign of “badness”. The pan-moralist tradition of ancient China seems to be closely combined with the Communist era’s strong belief in political-ideological correctness, and its strong belief in social engineering. It is interesting to note that my research on crime and deviance in China in the 1980s and 1990s seems to be confirmed by today’s discourse, although there are new moral panics and new forms of medical-moralistic definitions of deviance in China today. Still, the categories of deviance are very much socially constructed entities closely related to the moral-political order of present day China. I will use three cases to underline my argument. First, the type of deviance I call “majority deviance”, related to the case of the prejudice and dangers associated with the only-child. My second example has to do with what I term the “wayward girl” and the moral panics concerning so-called zaolian – or “premature love” among young girls. The third example is the new panic surrounding “internet addiction disorder” or IAD. While the “disco” and the “dance hall” were the sites of disorder in the 1980s and 90s, the wangba – or “internet bar” is now seen as the most dangerous site of crime and deviance.
Description亞洲犯罪學學會
Conference Theme: Asian Innovations in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Part 5: Juvenile Delinquency and Justice
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146508

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBakken, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T08:06:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T08:06:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 3rd Annual International Conference of the Asian Criminological Society (ACS), Taipei, Taiwan, 16-19 December 2011. In Conference Proceedings, 2011, p. 152-166en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146508-
dc.description亞洲犯罪學學會en_US
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Asian Innovations in Criminology and Criminal Justice-
dc.descriptionPart 5: Juvenile Delinquency and Justice-
dc.description.abstractConrad and Schneider’s now classical work on the historical transformation of definitions of deviance from “badness” to “sickness” is relevant for the situation in China today, although with some modifications. The weakly founded medical/psychiatric profession and the strong political/ideological discourse in China leads to a strange combination of medicalization and moralization, even criminalization of deviance. The “sick” is often combined with the “bad”, and “sickness” is often seen as a secondary sign of “badness”. The pan-moralist tradition of ancient China seems to be closely combined with the Communist era’s strong belief in political-ideological correctness, and its strong belief in social engineering. It is interesting to note that my research on crime and deviance in China in the 1980s and 1990s seems to be confirmed by today’s discourse, although there are new moral panics and new forms of medical-moralistic definitions of deviance in China today. Still, the categories of deviance are very much socially constructed entities closely related to the moral-political order of present day China. I will use three cases to underline my argument. First, the type of deviance I call “majority deviance”, related to the case of the prejudice and dangers associated with the only-child. My second example has to do with what I term the “wayward girl” and the moral panics concerning so-called zaolian – or “premature love” among young girls. The third example is the new panic surrounding “internet addiction disorder” or IAD. While the “disco” and the “dance hall” were the sites of disorder in the 1980s and 90s, the wangba – or “internet bar” is now seen as the most dangerous site of crime and deviance.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Asian Criminological Society (ACS).-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the 3rd Annual ACS Conferenceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe medicalization of deviance in Chinaen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailBakken, B: bakken@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBakken, B=rp00616en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros199235en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros199237-
dc.identifier.spage152-
dc.identifier.epage166-
dc.publisher.placeTaiwanen_US

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