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Article: Identifying mediators of training effects on performance-related psychobiosocial states: A single-case observational study in an elite female triathlete

TitleIdentifying mediators of training effects on performance-related psychobiosocial states: A single-case observational study in an elite female triathlete
Authors
KeywordsDynamic linear model
Mediation
Self-reported psychobiosocial states
Single-case study
Sport
Triathlon
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2012, v. 13 n. 5, p. 541-549 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Relationships between training load, psychobiosocial (PBS) states and performance are dynamic and individual-specific. The nature of these relationships can be investigated using a combination of dynamic linear models (DLMs) and mediating variable analysis, potentially assisting applied sports psychologists in planning and monitoring of individual elite athletes' intervention programmes. Design: We illustrate this approach by examining the relationships of training loads with a performance-related state ('self-efficacy') and the role of potential mediating PBS variables ('fatigue/lack of energy' and 'being in shape') in explaining these relationships in an elite triathlete across time. Method: Self-reports of PBS states (twice weekly) and training data were collected over 137 days. Using DLMs and mediating variable analysis, direct (unmediated) and indirect (mediated) short-term associations of training load with 'self-efficacy' were examined. Results: In this triathlete, we found evidence for positive effects of training on 'self-efficacy', which were partly explained by feelings of 'being in shape' and suppressed by feelings of 'fatigue/lack of energy'. Changes in the relationship between lagged training load and 'fatigue/lack of energy' were observed across time and were particularly pronounced in temporal proximity of an injury. Conclusion: Strengths of the presented approach are its dynamic nature enabling the observation of changes occurring over time, use of statistical inference rather than visual data interpretation, and quantification of mediating effects to identify potential pathways of intervention. Additionally, the DLM method can identify complex nonlinear associations by examining correspondence between changes in levels of predictors and changes in magnitude and direction of predictor-outcome associations. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146441
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Queensland Academy of Sport Research Grant190606
CQ University Research Training Scheme grant
Funding Information:

We thank the triathlete for her dedication to the data collection and her coach for supporting the study. This study was supported by Queensland Academy of Sport Research Grant 190606 and a CQ University Research Training Scheme grant.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorReaburn, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHooper, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T07:54:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T07:54:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2012, v. 13 n. 5, p. 541-549en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146441-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Relationships between training load, psychobiosocial (PBS) states and performance are dynamic and individual-specific. The nature of these relationships can be investigated using a combination of dynamic linear models (DLMs) and mediating variable analysis, potentially assisting applied sports psychologists in planning and monitoring of individual elite athletes' intervention programmes. Design: We illustrate this approach by examining the relationships of training loads with a performance-related state ('self-efficacy') and the role of potential mediating PBS variables ('fatigue/lack of energy' and 'being in shape') in explaining these relationships in an elite triathlete across time. Method: Self-reports of PBS states (twice weekly) and training data were collected over 137 days. Using DLMs and mediating variable analysis, direct (unmediated) and indirect (mediated) short-term associations of training load with 'self-efficacy' were examined. Results: In this triathlete, we found evidence for positive effects of training on 'self-efficacy', which were partly explained by feelings of 'being in shape' and suppressed by feelings of 'fatigue/lack of energy'. Changes in the relationship between lagged training load and 'fatigue/lack of energy' were observed across time and were particularly pronounced in temporal proximity of an injury. Conclusion: Strengths of the presented approach are its dynamic nature enabling the observation of changes occurring over time, use of statistical inference rather than visual data interpretation, and quantification of mediating effects to identify potential pathways of intervention. Additionally, the DLM method can identify complex nonlinear associations by examining correspondence between changes in levels of predictors and changes in magnitude and direction of predictor-outcome associations. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsporten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_HK
dc.subjectDynamic linear modelen_HK
dc.subjectMediationen_HK
dc.subjectSelf-reported psychobiosocial statesen_HK
dc.subjectSingle-case studyen_HK
dc.subjectSporten_HK
dc.subjectTriathlonen_HK
dc.titleIdentifying mediators of training effects on performance-related psychobiosocial states: A single-case observational study in an elite female triathleteen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2012.02.010en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859642106en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199224en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859642106&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage541en_HK
dc.identifier.epage549en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000306255700004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarnett, A=35195335800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReaburn, P=6603399741en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHooper, S=7102681287en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10472514-

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