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Article: Associations between perceived neighborhood environmental attributes and adults' sedentary behavior: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium

TitleAssociations between perceived neighborhood environmental attributes and adults' sedentary behavior: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgium
Authors
KeywordsAustralia
Belgium
Built environment
Dose-response
NEWS
Pooled analyses
Sitting
USA
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
Citation
Social Science And Medicine, 2012, v. 74 n. 9, p. 1375-1384 How to Cite?
AbstractSedentary behaviors are associated with multiple health problems, independently of physical activity. Neighborhood environment attributes might influence sedentary behaviors, but few studies have investigated these relationships. Moreover, all previous studies have been conducted within single countries, limiting environmental variability. We investigated the shape of associations between perceived neighborhood environment attributes and sedentary behavior in three countries; and whether these associations differed by country and gender. Data from USA (Seattle and Baltimore regions), Australia (Adelaide) and Belgium (Ghent) were pooled. Data collection took place between 2002 and 2008. In total, 6014 adults (20-65 years, 55.7% women) were recruited in high-/low-walkability and high-/low-income neighborhoods. All participants completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (domain-specific physical activity, transport-related sitting and overall time spent sitting) and the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale (environmental perceptions). The number of destinations within a 20 min walk from home, perceiving few cul-de-sacs, good walking and cycling facilities, and traffic safety were included in an index of motorized transport correlates. This index was linearly negatively associated with motorized transport time, so the higher the scores on the index (more activity-friendliness), the lower the amount of motorized transport. No gender- or country-differences were identified. Perceived aesthetics and proximity of destinations were included in an index of overall sitting time correlates. A linear negative relationship with overall sitting time was found, but associations were stronger for men and not significant in Belgian adults. In conclusion, consistent and expected correlates were found for motorized transport in the three countries, but results were less clear for overall sitting time. Future studies should include even more countries to maximize environmental variability, but present findings suggest that neighborhoods may be designed to improve health through supporting more active and less sedentary transportation, which can be expected to have health benefits. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146440
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.814
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.894
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Foundation Flanders (FWO)B/09731/01
National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia569940
1003960
Health Department of Victoria
National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)R01 HL67350
R01 CA127296
Funding Information:

This research was supported by Research Foundation Flanders (FWO) B/09731/01. NO was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Program Grant #569940, Fellowship #1003960 and by research infrastructure funding from the Health Department of Victoria. The NQLS study was originally funded by National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Grant #R01 HL67350; work on this paper also was conducted in part under funding for the International Physical activity and the Environment Network (IPEN): Grant #R01 CA127296. The authors would also like to acknowledge Kelli Cain, whose efforts have been critical for NQLS and IPEN.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Dyck, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorConway, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ien_HK
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCardon, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFrank, LDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSaelens, BEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSallis, JFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T07:54:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T07:54:02Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSocial Science And Medicine, 2012, v. 74 n. 9, p. 1375-1384en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146440-
dc.description.abstractSedentary behaviors are associated with multiple health problems, independently of physical activity. Neighborhood environment attributes might influence sedentary behaviors, but few studies have investigated these relationships. Moreover, all previous studies have been conducted within single countries, limiting environmental variability. We investigated the shape of associations between perceived neighborhood environment attributes and sedentary behavior in three countries; and whether these associations differed by country and gender. Data from USA (Seattle and Baltimore regions), Australia (Adelaide) and Belgium (Ghent) were pooled. Data collection took place between 2002 and 2008. In total, 6014 adults (20-65 years, 55.7% women) were recruited in high-/low-walkability and high-/low-income neighborhoods. All participants completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (domain-specific physical activity, transport-related sitting and overall time spent sitting) and the Neighborhood Environmental Walkability Scale (environmental perceptions). The number of destinations within a 20 min walk from home, perceiving few cul-de-sacs, good walking and cycling facilities, and traffic safety were included in an index of motorized transport correlates. This index was linearly negatively associated with motorized transport time, so the higher the scores on the index (more activity-friendliness), the lower the amount of motorized transport. No gender- or country-differences were identified. Perceived aesthetics and proximity of destinations were included in an index of overall sitting time correlates. A linear negative relationship with overall sitting time was found, but associations were stronger for men and not significant in Belgian adults. In conclusion, consistent and expected correlates were found for motorized transport in the three countries, but results were less clear for overall sitting time. Future studies should include even more countries to maximize environmental variability, but present findings suggest that neighborhoods may be designed to improve health through supporting more active and less sedentary transportation, which can be expected to have health benefits. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimeden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Science and Medicineen_HK
dc.subjectAustraliaen_HK
dc.subjectBelgiumen_HK
dc.subjectBuilt environmenten_HK
dc.subjectDose-responseen_HK
dc.subjectNEWSen_HK
dc.subjectPooled analysesen_HK
dc.subjectSittingen_HK
dc.subjectUSAen_HK
dc.titleAssociations between perceived neighborhood environmental attributes and adults' sedentary behavior: Findings from the USA, Australia and Belgiumen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.01.018en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22405686-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3321105-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859436786en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199223en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859436786&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume74en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1375en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1384en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303487700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectIPEN: International Study of Built Environment, Physical Activity, and Obesity-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Dyck, D=35621009100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConway, TL=55047642600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Bourdeaudhuij, I=35510873600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKerr, J=7401908338en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCardon, G=7004013463en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFrank, LD=7201908054en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaelens, BE=6701427555en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSallis, JF=7102766542en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10527259-

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