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Article: Correlates of change in adults' television viewing time: A four-year follow-up study

TitleCorrelates of change in adults' television viewing time: A four-year follow-up study
Authors
Keywordsecological models
environment
longitudinal study
physical activity
Sedentary behavior
Issue Date2012
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.org
Citation
Medicine And Science In Sports And Exercise, 2012, v. 44 n. 7, p. 1287-1292 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Adults tend to increase their television (TV) viewing time as they age, but little is known about attributes associated with change in TV viewing over time. This study examined individual, social, and environmental correlates of change in TV viewing time for 4 yr. Methods: Adult participants (n = 897) from a longitudinal epidemiological study in Adelaide, Australia, reported TV viewing time at baseline (2003-2004) and at follow-up (2007-2008). Generalized linear modeling was used to examine correlates of change in TV viewing time. Results: The mean TV viewing time increased from 112 to 116 min•d from baseline to follow-up. Adjusted for TV viewing time at baseline, having a tertiary education was associated with a 13% lower TV time at follow-up (P = 0.007). Each additional hour of occupational and transport physical activity at baseline was associated with a 2% and 7% lower TV viewing at follow-up (P = 0.031 and P = 0.023, respectively). For men, an additional hour of domestic physical activity was associated with a 7% higher TV viewing time at follow-up (P = 0.006). A significant neighborhood walkability × working status interaction (P = 0.035) indicated that, for those who were not working, living in a highly walkable neighborhood was associated with a 23% lower TV viewing time at follow-up (P = 0.003). Conclusions: Adults with lower educational attainment, adults with lower occupational and transport physical activity, men with higher domestic physical activity, and nonworking adults living in lowly walkable neighborhoods were at higher risk of increase in TV viewing time. Interventions should target multiple variables at the individual, social, and environmental levels to address age-related increases in TV viewing time. © 2012 by the American College of Sports Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146439
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.041
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.007
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia569940
Queensland Health
1003960
Funding Information:

Ding, Owen, and Sugiyama were supported by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Program grant 569940, by a research infrastructure grant from Queensland Health, and by fellowship no. 1003960 (Owen).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDing, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorSugiyama, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorWinkler, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorWijndaele, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T07:54:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T07:54:01Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedicine And Science In Sports And Exercise, 2012, v. 44 n. 7, p. 1287-1292en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146439-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Adults tend to increase their television (TV) viewing time as they age, but little is known about attributes associated with change in TV viewing over time. This study examined individual, social, and environmental correlates of change in TV viewing time for 4 yr. Methods: Adult participants (n = 897) from a longitudinal epidemiological study in Adelaide, Australia, reported TV viewing time at baseline (2003-2004) and at follow-up (2007-2008). Generalized linear modeling was used to examine correlates of change in TV viewing time. Results: The mean TV viewing time increased from 112 to 116 min•d from baseline to follow-up. Adjusted for TV viewing time at baseline, having a tertiary education was associated with a 13% lower TV time at follow-up (P = 0.007). Each additional hour of occupational and transport physical activity at baseline was associated with a 2% and 7% lower TV viewing at follow-up (P = 0.031 and P = 0.023, respectively). For men, an additional hour of domestic physical activity was associated with a 7% higher TV viewing time at follow-up (P = 0.006). A significant neighborhood walkability × working status interaction (P = 0.035) indicated that, for those who were not working, living in a highly walkable neighborhood was associated with a 23% lower TV viewing time at follow-up (P = 0.003). Conclusions: Adults with lower educational attainment, adults with lower occupational and transport physical activity, men with higher domestic physical activity, and nonworking adults living in lowly walkable neighborhoods were at higher risk of increase in TV viewing time. Interventions should target multiple variables at the individual, social, and environmental levels to address age-related increases in TV viewing time. © 2012 by the American College of Sports Medicine.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.acsm-msse.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedicine and Science in Sports and Exerciseen_HK
dc.subjectecological modelsen_HK
dc.subjectenvironmenten_HK
dc.subjectlongitudinal studyen_HK
dc.subjectphysical activityen_HK
dc.subjectSedentary behavioren_HK
dc.subject.meshSedentary Lifestyle-
dc.subject.meshTelevision - utilization-
dc.subject.meshLinear Models-
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity-
dc.subject.meshSocial Environment-
dc.titleCorrelates of change in adults' television viewing time: A four-year follow-up studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/MSS.0b013e31824ba87een_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22297804-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862766685en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199222en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros205733-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862766685&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume44en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1287en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1292en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305473200012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, D=35331652300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSugiyama, T=18438631200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWinkler, E=54936676600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWijndaele, K=8614240700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_HK
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 131204-

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