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Article: Impact of an active video game on healthy children's physical activity

TitleImpact of an active video game on healthy children's physical activity
Authors
KeywordsExergames
Wii
Issue Date2012
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
Citation
Pediatrics, 2012, v. 129 n. 3, p. e636-e642 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: This naturalistic study tests whether children receiving a new (to them) active video game spontaneously engage in more physical activity than those receiving an inactive video game, and whether the effect would be greater among children in unsafe neighborhoods, who might not be allowed to play outside. METHODS: Participants were children 9 to 12 years of age, with a BMI >50th percentile, but <99th percentile; none of these children a medical condition that would preclude physical activity or playing video games. A randomized clinical trial assigned children to receiving 2 active or 2 inactive video games, the peripherals necessary to run the games, and a Wii console. Physical activity was monitored by using accelerometers for 5 weeks over the course of a 13-week experiment. Neighborhood safety was assessed with a 12 item validated questionnaire. RESULTS: There was no evidence that children receiving the active video games were more active in general, or at anytime, than children receiving the inactive video games. The outcomes were not moderated by parent perceived neighborhood safety, child BMI z score, or other demographic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide no reason to believe that simply acquiring an active video game under naturalistic circumstances provides a public health benefit to children. Copyright © 2012 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146437
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.196
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.226
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Cancer InstituteCA66724-01
USDA/ARS58-6250-6001
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Funding Information:

Primarily funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (CA66724-01). This work is also a publication of the United States Department of Agriculture/Agriculture Research Service (USDA/ARS), Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, and funded in part with federal funds from the USDA/ARS under Cooperative Agreement No. 58-6250-6001. Funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBaranowski, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorAbdelsamad, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaranowski, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, TMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, TAen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T07:54:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T07:54:00Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics, 2012, v. 129 n. 3, p. e636-e642en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146437-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: This naturalistic study tests whether children receiving a new (to them) active video game spontaneously engage in more physical activity than those receiving an inactive video game, and whether the effect would be greater among children in unsafe neighborhoods, who might not be allowed to play outside. METHODS: Participants were children 9 to 12 years of age, with a BMI >50th percentile, but <99th percentile; none of these children a medical condition that would preclude physical activity or playing video games. A randomized clinical trial assigned children to receiving 2 active or 2 inactive video games, the peripherals necessary to run the games, and a Wii console. Physical activity was monitored by using accelerometers for 5 weeks over the course of a 13-week experiment. Neighborhood safety was assessed with a 12 item validated questionnaire. RESULTS: There was no evidence that children receiving the active video games were more active in general, or at anytime, than children receiving the inactive video games. The outcomes were not moderated by parent perceived neighborhood safety, child BMI z score, or other demographic characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide no reason to believe that simply acquiring an active video game under naturalistic circumstances provides a public health benefit to children. Copyright © 2012 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectExergamesen_HK
dc.subjectWiien_HK
dc.titleImpact of an active video game on healthy children's physical activityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2011-2050en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22371457-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3289528-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863230642en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199220en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863230642&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume129en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee636en_HK
dc.identifier.epagee642en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302541000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaranowski, T=7004458126en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAbdelsamad, D=55005989900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaranowski, J=55220544100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO'Connor, TM=28467467300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThompson, D=9735772500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarnett, A=35195335800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, TA=36522585900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10391887-

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