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Article: The effects of psychotherapy on psychological well-being and diurnal cortisol patterns in breast cancer survivors

TitleThe effects of psychotherapy on psychological well-being and diurnal cortisol patterns in breast cancer survivors
Authors
KeywordsBody-mind-spirit therapy
Breast cancer
Psychological well-being
Psychotherapy
Salivary diurnal cortisol pattern
Survivors
Issue Date2012
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/PPS
Citation
Psychotherapy And Psychosomatics, 2012, v. 81 n. 3, p. 173-182 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Neuroendocrine dysregulation influenced by psychosocial stress is related to breast cancer recurrence. Very few studies examine the impacts of psychotherapy on diurnal cortisol patterns among breast cancer survivors. Methods: Forty-eight breast cancer patients who completed active cancer treatment were randomly assigned to receive either 8 weekly body-mind-spirit (BMS) group therapy sessions or 1 educational (EDU) session. Self-report measures included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Meaning in Life questionnaire (MLQ) including two subscales: MLQ-Presence and MLQ-Search. Salivary cortisol levels were collected by the subjects in their homes at the time of awakening, 30 and 45 min after awakening, and at 12.00, 17.00, and 21.00 h. Measurement time points include baseline, the 2nd month (completion of BMS therapy), the 5th month, and the 8th month. Results: There were no significant differences in BDI-II scores (p>0.05) and MLQ-Presence scores (p >0.05) between BMS and EDU groups at baseline or across the three follow-ups. Nevertheless, greater MLQ-Search scores were found in the BMS group compared to the EDU group during the 5th month of follow-up (p <0.01). The higher level of cortisol at 21.00 h (p < 0.01) and a flatter diurnal cortisol pattern were more likely to occur in EDU than in BMS participants (p < 0.05) at the 8th month of follow-up. Conclusion: BMS group therapy likely contributed to enhancing an active search for meaning in life toward more opportunities for personal growth and to maintaining stable cortisol responses to everyday life stress for breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146417
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.632
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.657
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Startup Project97T099
Frontier and Innovative Research of National Taiwan University98R0304
Funding Information:

The authors are grateful to the staff from the Foundation of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment, to Ms. Yun-Ting Lee and Yu-Han Tseng for their assistance in data collection and to Ms. Ming-Ru Wang for her help in cortisol analysis. This study was supported by grants from the Research Startup Project (97T099) and Frontier and Innovative Research of National Taiwan University (98R0304).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, FHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJow, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKuo, WHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChang, KJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, YFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, YMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, YTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-24T07:52:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-24T07:52:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychotherapy And Psychosomatics, 2012, v. 81 n. 3, p. 173-182en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-3190en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146417-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Neuroendocrine dysregulation influenced by psychosocial stress is related to breast cancer recurrence. Very few studies examine the impacts of psychotherapy on diurnal cortisol patterns among breast cancer survivors. Methods: Forty-eight breast cancer patients who completed active cancer treatment were randomly assigned to receive either 8 weekly body-mind-spirit (BMS) group therapy sessions or 1 educational (EDU) session. Self-report measures included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Meaning in Life questionnaire (MLQ) including two subscales: MLQ-Presence and MLQ-Search. Salivary cortisol levels were collected by the subjects in their homes at the time of awakening, 30 and 45 min after awakening, and at 12.00, 17.00, and 21.00 h. Measurement time points include baseline, the 2nd month (completion of BMS therapy), the 5th month, and the 8th month. Results: There were no significant differences in BDI-II scores (p>0.05) and MLQ-Presence scores (p >0.05) between BMS and EDU groups at baseline or across the three follow-ups. Nevertheless, greater MLQ-Search scores were found in the BMS group compared to the EDU group during the 5th month of follow-up (p <0.01). The higher level of cortisol at 21.00 h (p < 0.01) and a flatter diurnal cortisol pattern were more likely to occur in EDU than in BMS participants (p < 0.05) at the 8th month of follow-up. Conclusion: BMS group therapy likely contributed to enhancing an active search for meaning in life toward more opportunities for personal growth and to maintaining stable cortisol responses to everyday life stress for breast cancer survivors. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/PPSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychotherapy and Psychosomaticsen_HK
dc.rightsPsychotherapy and Psychosomatics. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subjectBody-mind-spirit therapyen_HK
dc.subjectBreast canceren_HK
dc.subjectPsychological well-beingen_HK
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen_HK
dc.subjectSalivary diurnal cortisol patternen_HK
dc.subjectSurvivorsen_HK
dc.titleThe effects of psychotherapy on psychological well-being and diurnal cortisol patterns in breast cancer survivorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000329178en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22399076-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862830338en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199138en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862830338&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume81en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage173en_HK
dc.identifier.epage182en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303087200005-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, FH=7006744649en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJow, GM=6603159405en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuo, WH=9632733700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChang, KJ=36071657200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, YF=24830728400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, SM=7403358478en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=55257397900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, YM=7401512146en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, YT=49963217300en_HK

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