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Postgraduate Thesis: The missing link: the social history ofChang's Manor through local ordinary stories
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TitleThe missing link: the social history ofChang's Manor through local ordinary stories
 
AuthorsZhu, Yajing.
朱雅婧.
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractIn Qing Dynasty, Chang’s family was one of the most famous merchants of the Shanxi ancient business. Chang’s Manor, which has a history of more than 200 years, stays as the most awarded civil building assembly among all the Shanxi compounds by its elaborate sculptures, wooden decorated archways, brick sculpted walls and many other art forms. Since 2001, Chang’s Manor has been commercialized for tourism purpose. Many “interesting stories” have been made up while lots of facts which are the real “people’s history” were left out and may be lost forever. This is also a common problem within many heritages which have been transformed into tourist attractions in China. And this arouses my research interests. In this dissertation, I would like to seek and tell the “true stories” from 1949 to 2001 in accordance with my conversation with the original habitants who have had real life experience of the original places. Surely, I will identify the real social value of Chang’s Manor through the interpretation of the true stories from local people.
 
DegreeMaster of Science in Conservation
 
SubjectCourtyard houses - China - Shanxi Sheng.
Architecture, Domestic - China - Shanxi Sheng.
 
Dept/ProgramConservation
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Yajing.
 
dc.contributor.author朱雅婧.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2010
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractIn Qing Dynasty, Chang’s family was one of the most famous merchants of the Shanxi ancient business. Chang’s Manor, which has a history of more than 200 years, stays as the most awarded civil building assembly among all the Shanxi compounds by its elaborate sculptures, wooden decorated archways, brick sculpted walls and many other art forms. Since 2001, Chang’s Manor has been commercialized for tourism purpose. Many “interesting stories” have been made up while lots of facts which are the real “people’s history” were left out and may be lost forever. This is also a common problem within many heritages which have been transformed into tourist attractions in China. And this arouses my research interests. In this dissertation, I would like to seek and tell the “true stories” from 1949 to 2001 in accordance with my conversation with the original habitants who have had real life experience of the original places. Surely, I will identify the real social value of Chang’s Manor through the interpretation of the true stories from local people.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineConservation
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Science in Conservation
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4709323
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47093237
 
dc.subject.lcshCourtyard houses - China - Shanxi Sheng.
 
dc.subject.lcshArchitecture, Domestic - China - Shanxi Sheng.
 
dc.titleThe missing link: the social history ofChang's Manor through local ordinary stories
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<description.abstract>&#65279;In Qing Dynasty, Chang&#8217;s family was one of the most famous merchants of the Shanxi ancient business. Chang&#8217;s Manor, which has a history of more than 200 years, stays as the most awarded civil building assembly among all the Shanxi compounds by its elaborate sculptures, wooden decorated archways, brick sculpted walls and many other art forms.



Since 2001, Chang&#8217;s Manor has been commercialized for tourism purpose. Many &#8220;interesting stories&#8221; have been made up while lots of facts which are the real &#8220;people&#8217;s history&#8221; were left out and may be lost forever. This is also a common problem within many heritages which have been transformed into tourist attractions in China. And this arouses my research interests.



In this dissertation, I would like to seek and tell the &#8220;true stories&#8221; from 1949 to 2001 in accordance with my conversation with the original habitants who have had real life experience of the original places. Surely, I will identify the real social value of Chang&#8217;s Manor through the interpretation of the true stories from local people.</description.abstract>
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<subject.lcsh>Courtyard houses - China - Shanxi Sheng.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Architecture, Domestic - China - Shanxi Sheng.</subject.lcsh>
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