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Postgraduate Thesis: Changing Shichahai: an historic district for a modern world
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TitleChanging Shichahai: an historic district for a modern world
 
AuthorsJin, You
靳悠
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractBeijing is the most important and dynamic city in China. A vital ingredient in that success has been its historic environment- its imperial palaces, its temples, its siheyuans, its hutongs- which provides the texture of the Old Beijing city. The historic environment is key to Beijing’s prosperity and a social asset of value. Nearly all the most prosperous and desirable areas in Beijing, the places where people most want to live, work and visit, are those where the historic environment is a dominant influence. The article, “World Heritage Areas: A Critical Analysis”, written by Peter Neville, Hadley in National Post Canada says: UNESCO's World Heritage List is intended to help preserve historic sites, but in China, inclusion on the list can be the kiss of death. The major "carrot" of heritage designation is the increased levels of tourism its prestige generates. Apparently, not only the designated heritage sites, but all the heritages are faced with the fate of being destroyed by tourism and development. Old buildings and lanes in Beijing never stop drawing visitors. The city, even the whole country is now proud of prosperous tourism which is always associated with ‘economic flourishing’. Virtually, every introduction tourism text contains at least one chapter discussing the social, cultural, and environmental impacts of tourism. This topic has also been the subject of extensive investigation in the academic literature. However, in regions that are undergoing rapid development and where an ethos of conservation has not been established, often surprising ignorance of the negative consequences of tourism exists. In China, the attitude is still that the benefits of economic development outweigh any adverse costs such development may have. However, such an attitude is now seen as being shortsighted. As a result, a more balanced approach to tourism is advocated, acknowledging both its beneficial and detrimental effects on host communities and their cultures. Conservation is about ensuring that we make the best use of our historic environment. It is a tool for managing change. Some still believe that conservation is simple about preserving the fabric of old buildings unchanged and developing the economic potential of tourism. They failed to see that conservation is an overarching work, the opposite of a wasteful society. It is easy to destroy - and today we have the tools, the money and the technology - but difficult to create. Cultural heritage, areas, landscapes and communities are a finite resource. Once lost they are lost forever. The purpose of conservation is to ensure that destruction is kept to a minimum while allowing creativity and innovation to flourish. We should preserve the town of the past for the man of the future.
 
DegreeMaster of Science in Conservation
 
SubjectStreets - China - Shichahai (Beijing)
Vernacular architecture - Conservation and restoration - China - Shichahai (Beijing)
Cultural property - Conservation and restoration - China - Shichahai (Beijing)
 
Dept/ProgramConservation
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorJin, You
 
dc.contributor.author靳悠
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2009
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBeijing is the most important and dynamic city in China. A vital ingredient in that success has been its historic environment- its imperial palaces, its temples, its siheyuans, its hutongs- which provides the texture of the Old Beijing city. The historic environment is key to Beijing’s prosperity and a social asset of value. Nearly all the most prosperous and desirable areas in Beijing, the places where people most want to live, work and visit, are those where the historic environment is a dominant influence. The article, “World Heritage Areas: A Critical Analysis”, written by Peter Neville, Hadley in National Post Canada says: UNESCO's World Heritage List is intended to help preserve historic sites, but in China, inclusion on the list can be the kiss of death. The major "carrot" of heritage designation is the increased levels of tourism its prestige generates. Apparently, not only the designated heritage sites, but all the heritages are faced with the fate of being destroyed by tourism and development. Old buildings and lanes in Beijing never stop drawing visitors. The city, even the whole country is now proud of prosperous tourism which is always associated with ‘economic flourishing’. Virtually, every introduction tourism text contains at least one chapter discussing the social, cultural, and environmental impacts of tourism. This topic has also been the subject of extensive investigation in the academic literature. However, in regions that are undergoing rapid development and where an ethos of conservation has not been established, often surprising ignorance of the negative consequences of tourism exists. In China, the attitude is still that the benefits of economic development outweigh any adverse costs such development may have. However, such an attitude is now seen as being shortsighted. As a result, a more balanced approach to tourism is advocated, acknowledging both its beneficial and detrimental effects on host communities and their cultures. Conservation is about ensuring that we make the best use of our historic environment. It is a tool for managing change. Some still believe that conservation is simple about preserving the fabric of old buildings unchanged and developing the economic potential of tourism. They failed to see that conservation is an overarching work, the opposite of a wasteful society. It is easy to destroy - and today we have the tools, the money and the technology - but difficult to create. Cultural heritage, areas, landscapes and communities are a finite resource. Once lost they are lost forever. The purpose of conservation is to ensure that destruction is kept to a minimum while allowing creativity and innovation to flourish. We should preserve the town of the past for the man of the future.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineConservation
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Science in Conservation
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4709088
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47090881
 
dc.subject.lcshStreets - China - Shichahai (Beijing)
 
dc.subject.lcshVernacular architecture - Conservation and restoration - China - Shichahai (Beijing)
 
dc.subject.lcshCultural property - Conservation and restoration - China - Shichahai (Beijing)
 
dc.titleChanging Shichahai: an historic district for a modern world
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Jin, You</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>&#38771;&#24736;</contributor.author>
<date.issued>2009</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;Beijing is the most important and dynamic city in China. A vital ingredient in that success has been its historic environment- its imperial palaces, its temples, its siheyuans, its hutongs- which provides the texture of the Old Beijing city. The historic environment is key to Beijing&#8217;s prosperity and a social asset of value. Nearly all the most prosperous and desirable areas in Beijing, the places where people most want to live, work and visit, are those where the historic environment is a dominant influence. 



The article, &#8220;World Heritage Areas: A Critical Analysis&#8221;, written by Peter Neville, Hadley in National Post Canada says: 



UNESCO&apos;s World Heritage List is intended to help preserve historic sites, but in China, inclusion on the list can be the kiss of death. The major &quot;carrot&quot; of heritage designation is the increased levels of tourism its prestige generates.



Apparently, not only the designated heritage sites, but all the heritages are faced with the fate of being destroyed by tourism and development. Old buildings and lanes in Beijing never stop drawing visitors. The city, even the whole country is now proud of prosperous tourism which is always associated with &#8216;economic flourishing&#8217;. 



Virtually, every introduction tourism text contains at least one chapter discussing the social, cultural, and environmental impacts of tourism. This topic has also been the subject of extensive investigation in the academic literature. However, in regions that are undergoing rapid development and where an ethos of conservation has not been established, often surprising ignorance of the negative consequences of tourism exists. 



In China, the attitude is still that the benefits of economic development outweigh any adverse costs such development may have. However, such an attitude is now seen as being shortsighted. As a result, a more balanced approach to tourism is advocated, acknowledging both its beneficial and detrimental effects on host communities and their cultures.



Conservation is about ensuring that we make the best use of our historic environment. It is a tool for managing change. Some still believe that conservation is simple about preserving the fabric of old buildings unchanged and developing the economic potential of tourism. They failed to see that conservation is an overarching work, the opposite of a wasteful society. It is easy to destroy - and today we have the tools, the money and the technology - but difficult to create. Cultural heritage, areas, landscapes and communities are a finite resource. Once lost they are lost forever. The purpose of conservation is to ensure that destruction is kept to a minimum while allowing creativity and innovation to flourish. 



We should preserve the town of the past for the man of the future.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>HKU Theses Online (HKUTO)</relation.ispartof>
<rights>The author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.</rights>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<source.uri>http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47090881</source.uri>
<subject.lcsh>Streets - China - Shichahai (Beijing)</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Vernacular architecture - Conservation and restoration - China - Shichahai (Beijing)</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Cultural property - Conservation and restoration - China - Shichahai (Beijing)</subject.lcsh>
<title>Changing Shichahai: an historic district for a modern world</title>
<type>PG_Thesis</type>
<identifier.hkul>b4709088</identifier.hkul>
<description.thesisname>Master of Science in Conservation</description.thesisname>
<description.thesislevel>master&apos;s</description.thesislevel>
<description.thesisdiscipline>Conservation</description.thesisdiscipline>
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<date.hkucongregation>2009</date.hkucongregation>
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