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Conference Paper: Juvenile probationers adjudicated of violent and nonviolent offenses in Hong Kong: are they psychologically different?

TitleJuvenile probationers adjudicated of violent and nonviolent offenses in Hong Kong: are they psychologically different?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAsian Criminological Society (ACS).
Citation
The 3rd Annual Conference of the Asian Criminological Society (ACS 2011), Taipei, Taiwan, 17-19 December 2011. In Conference Proceedings, 2011, p. 404-415 How to Cite?
AbstractLimited is known about Hong Kong juvenile offenders who are put on probation. This study consists of 109 male juveniles (aged 14-20 years) who served their probation sentence in a community transitional housing. Of the sample, 34 juveniles are adjudicated for committing a violent offense, while the remaining 75 juveniles are found guilty of a nonviolent offense. Six psychometric measures assessing eight psychological correlates (self-esteem, life satisfaction, social bond, positive affect, negative affect, impulsivity, pro-offending attitudes, and self-perceived life problems) are administered. Four offending history variables (onset age of delinquent behavior, age of first adjudication, number of prior adjudication, and frequency of self-reported delinquency in the past 12 month) are also studied. For exploratory purpose, univariate and bivariate analyses of these two groups (juvenile violent and nonviolent probationers) are first computed. Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression analyses indicate that several static (offending history) and dynamic (psychological correlates) risk factors are predictors of the juvenile violent and nonviolent probationers’ self-anticipated re-offending risk. Limitations of the study are outlined.
DescriptionConference Theme: Asian Innovations in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Part 9: Psychological and Family Factors and Crime
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146058

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, OHCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChui, WHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:08:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:08:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 3rd Annual Conference of the Asian Criminological Society (ACS 2011), Taipei, Taiwan, 17-19 December 2011. In Conference Proceedings, 2011, p. 404-415en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/146058-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Asian Innovations in Criminology and Criminal Justice-
dc.descriptionPart 9: Psychological and Family Factors and Crime-
dc.description.abstractLimited is known about Hong Kong juvenile offenders who are put on probation. This study consists of 109 male juveniles (aged 14-20 years) who served their probation sentence in a community transitional housing. Of the sample, 34 juveniles are adjudicated for committing a violent offense, while the remaining 75 juveniles are found guilty of a nonviolent offense. Six psychometric measures assessing eight psychological correlates (self-esteem, life satisfaction, social bond, positive affect, negative affect, impulsivity, pro-offending attitudes, and self-perceived life problems) are administered. Four offending history variables (onset age of delinquent behavior, age of first adjudication, number of prior adjudication, and frequency of self-reported delinquency in the past 12 month) are also studied. For exploratory purpose, univariate and bivariate analyses of these two groups (juvenile violent and nonviolent probationers) are first computed. Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression analyses indicate that several static (offending history) and dynamic (psychological correlates) risk factors are predictors of the juvenile violent and nonviolent probationers’ self-anticipated re-offending risk. Limitations of the study are outlined.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAsian Criminological Society (ACS).-
dc.relation.ispartof3rd ACS Annual Conference 2011 Proceedingsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleJuvenile probationers adjudicated of violent and nonviolent offenses in Hong Kong: are they psychologically different?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, OHC: ohcchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChui, WH: ericchui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChui, WH=rp00854en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros199020en_US
dc.identifier.spage404-
dc.identifier.epage415-
dc.publisher.placeTaiwan-

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