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Article: The Democracy of FLOSS: Software Procurement Under the Democratic Principle

TitleThe Democracy of FLOSS: Software Procurement Under the Democratic Principle
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherUniversity of Ottawa Law & Technology Journal (UOLTJ). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.uoltj.ca
Citation
University of Ottawa Law & Technology Journal, 2008, v. 5 n. 1-2, p. 79-124 How to Cite?
AbstractIS IT WRONG TO ALLOW IDEOLOGY to pervade political decisions on software procurement, or is it inevitable that governments profess a particular conception of the good with respect to every aspect of societal life? This article advances a normative framework, based upon a broad conception of the democratic principle, to advocate that Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) be adopted and have its development encouraged and carried out by democratic governments. More than an aspiration, formal and substantial reasons ground the understanding advocated in this article that striving towards comprehensive FLOSS policies is a duty of every state that purports to be a democratic one. After a brief introduction of my propositions in Part 1, and a conceptualization of FLOSS in Part 2, Part 3 describes different governmental FLOSS policies around the world. These policies, I show, are often based upon normative values that, beyond stereotypes, would be better assessed within a thorough conception of the democratic principle. Part 4 portrays the Brazilian government’s particular history of expressly linking FLOSS policies to the democratic principle. Part 5 analyzes different dimensions of the democratic principle in the information age. Part 5 begins by conceptualizing the democratic principle in light of its relation with technology, in general, and FLOSS, in particular, and then evaluates the importance of FLOSS for the fulfillment of cultural, ethical, political, and economic dimensions of the democratic principle. In Part 6, the article concludes with a particular understanding of the commitment assumed in the Tunis round of the World Summit on the Information Society and reinforces this vision of the deontological character of governmental policies towards FLOSS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145996
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:05:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:05:17Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationUniversity of Ottawa Law & Technology Journal, 2008, v. 5 n. 1-2, p. 79-124en_US
dc.identifier.issn1710-6028en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145996-
dc.description.abstractIS IT WRONG TO ALLOW IDEOLOGY to pervade political decisions on software procurement, or is it inevitable that governments profess a particular conception of the good with respect to every aspect of societal life? This article advances a normative framework, based upon a broad conception of the democratic principle, to advocate that Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) be adopted and have its development encouraged and carried out by democratic governments. More than an aspiration, formal and substantial reasons ground the understanding advocated in this article that striving towards comprehensive FLOSS policies is a duty of every state that purports to be a democratic one. After a brief introduction of my propositions in Part 1, and a conceptualization of FLOSS in Part 2, Part 3 describes different governmental FLOSS policies around the world. These policies, I show, are often based upon normative values that, beyond stereotypes, would be better assessed within a thorough conception of the democratic principle. Part 4 portrays the Brazilian government’s particular history of expressly linking FLOSS policies to the democratic principle. Part 5 analyzes different dimensions of the democratic principle in the information age. Part 5 begins by conceptualizing the democratic principle in light of its relation with technology, in general, and FLOSS, in particular, and then evaluates the importance of FLOSS for the fulfillment of cultural, ethical, political, and economic dimensions of the democratic principle. In Part 6, the article concludes with a particular understanding of the commitment assumed in the Tunis round of the World Summit on the Information Society and reinforces this vision of the deontological character of governmental policies towards FLOSS.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Ottawa Law & Technology Journal (UOLTJ). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.uoltj.caen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity of Ottawa Law & Technology Journalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe Democracy of FLOSS: Software Procurement Under the Democratic Principleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThompson, M: marcelo.thompson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThompson, M=rp01293en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros199038en_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_US
dc.identifier.spage79en_US
dc.identifier.epage124en_US
dc.publisher.placeCanada-

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