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Article: Hyperglycaemia and vitamin D: a systematic overview

TitleHyperglycaemia and vitamin D: a systematic overview
Authors
KeywordsCalcium
Hyperglycaemia
Parathyroid hormone
Vascular disease vitamin D
Issue Date2012
PublisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cdr/index.htm
Citation
Current Diabetes Reviews, 2012, v. 8 n. 1, p. 18-31 How to Cite?
Abstract
Vitamin D plays a role in a range of functions that may impact on glycaemic control. In this study we systematically report on clinical studies evaluating the impact of vitamin D on aspects of hyperglycaemia in non-pregnant adults. A total of 1,294 articles, of which 417 were reviews, were identified. No well-designed randomised, controlled trials were identified that specifically investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation on glucose and insulin concentrations. The majority of the studies that are available were poorly designed, having limited numbers, short study duration, or were conducted in volunteers with normal baseline, as measured by 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), concentrations or used inadequate doses of the supplements to normalise vitamin D concentrations, or used inappropriate analyses. Most studies did not observe improvements in glycaemia, with few exceptions. The results were more equivocal for aspects of insulin resistance. Most found no benefit on measures of insulin resistance, although some did. However, more studies described improved insulin release, although data from the studies to date are really inadequate to provide any reliable conclusions. Well-conducted randomised, controlled trials with adequate vitamin D doses are required to effectively assess whether this vitamin can reduce the incidence of diabetes. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145987
ISSN
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.428

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Synlab Services GmbH
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, School of Population Health
  4. Universitätsklinikum Mannheim
  5. Yonsei University College of Medicine
  6. University of Birmingham
  7. Medizinische Universitat Graz
  8. Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital
  9. Chinese University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_US
dc.contributor.authorScragg, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, W-
dc.contributor.authorMärz, W-
dc.contributor.authorPilz, S-
dc.contributor.authorKim, HC-
dc.contributor.authorTomlinson, B-
dc.contributor.authorBosch, J-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK-
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:04:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:04:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Diabetes Reviews, 2012, v. 8 n. 1, p. 18-31en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-3998-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145987-
dc.description.abstractVitamin D plays a role in a range of functions that may impact on glycaemic control. In this study we systematically report on clinical studies evaluating the impact of vitamin D on aspects of hyperglycaemia in non-pregnant adults. A total of 1,294 articles, of which 417 were reviews, were identified. No well-designed randomised, controlled trials were identified that specifically investigated the effects of vitamin D supplementation on glucose and insulin concentrations. The majority of the studies that are available were poorly designed, having limited numbers, short study duration, or were conducted in volunteers with normal baseline, as measured by 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), concentrations or used inadequate doses of the supplements to normalise vitamin D concentrations, or used inappropriate analyses. Most studies did not observe improvements in glycaemia, with few exceptions. The results were more equivocal for aspects of insulin resistance. Most found no benefit on measures of insulin resistance, although some did. However, more studies described improved insulin release, although data from the studies to date are really inadequate to provide any reliable conclusions. Well-conducted randomised, controlled trials with adequate vitamin D doses are required to effectively assess whether this vitamin can reduce the incidence of diabetes. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cdr/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Diabetes Reviewsen_US
dc.subjectCalcium-
dc.subjectHyperglycaemia-
dc.subjectParathyroid hormone-
dc.subjectVascular disease vitamin D-
dc.subject.meshDietary supplements-
dc.subject.meshHyperglycemia - drug therapy-
dc.subject.meshInsulin resistance-
dc.subject.meshVitamin D - analogs and derivatives - blood - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshVitamins - blood - therapeutic use-
dc.titleHyperglycaemia and vitamin D: a systematic overviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomas, GN: neilt@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJiang, CQ: cqjiang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KK: chengkk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2174/157339912798829223-
dc.identifier.pmid22352447-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862910469-
dc.identifier.hkuros199114en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage18en_US
dc.identifier.epage31en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.customcontrol.immutablehys 130315-

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