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Article: Dietary habits and the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality in the Chinese population in Hong Kong
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TitleDietary habits and the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality in the Chinese population in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsOu, CQ1 2
Wong, CM1 2
Ho, SY2
Schooling, M2
Yang, L2
Hedley, AJ2
Lam, TH2
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 3, p. 254-258 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2009.103275
 
AbstractBackground Both diet and air pollution are associated with mortality risks. However, no epidemiological study has examined the potential interaction between diet and air pollution on mortality. We assessed their interaction on an additive scale. Methods We analysed the data on daily concentrations of ambient air pollutants (PM 10, NO 2, SO 2 and O 3) and a total of 23 484 deaths in 1998 in Hong Kong. A standardised questionnaire was used in all four death registries to collect food frequency data from proxy respondents while waiting for the registration to be completed. We fitted a linear odds ratio model and estimated excess relative risk due to the interaction (ERRI) between air pollution and regular consumption (at least once per week) of each food item to measure departure from additivity of effects on mortality. Results We observed consistently negative ERRI between all of the four pollutants and regular consumption of vegetables, fruits and soy. The effects of PM10, NO2 and O3 were significant smaller in the subjects who regularly consumed fruits than those who never or seldom consumed such food. The effect modification of soy consumption on PM 10, NO 2 and SO 2 associated mortality was also found statistically significant. However, regular consumption of dairy products was associated with significant increased effects of PM 10 and NO 2. Conclusions This study provides insight into dietary habit as one of the modifiers of health effects of air pollution. Our findings merit further studies to characterise the influence of diet on air pollution-related health and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.
 
ISSN0143-005X
2013 Impact Factor: 3.294
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2009.103275
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000300039600010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee631012
Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health
Hong Kong Health Care Promotion Fund215032
Funding Information:

The authors thank the Department of Health and Environmental Protection Department of Hong Kong for data and assistance. The authors would also like to thank the Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee (#631012) and Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health for funding the Hong Kong Lifestyle and Mortality study from which the data of this study were derived.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsImpact of air pollution on premature deaths in Hong Kong
A mega-case-control study (20,000 deaths and 30,000 controls) on smoking and mortality in Hong Kong
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, CM
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, M
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, L
 
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJ
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:04:38Z
 
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:04:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground Both diet and air pollution are associated with mortality risks. However, no epidemiological study has examined the potential interaction between diet and air pollution on mortality. We assessed their interaction on an additive scale. Methods We analysed the data on daily concentrations of ambient air pollutants (PM 10, NO 2, SO 2 and O 3) and a total of 23 484 deaths in 1998 in Hong Kong. A standardised questionnaire was used in all four death registries to collect food frequency data from proxy respondents while waiting for the registration to be completed. We fitted a linear odds ratio model and estimated excess relative risk due to the interaction (ERRI) between air pollution and regular consumption (at least once per week) of each food item to measure departure from additivity of effects on mortality. Results We observed consistently negative ERRI between all of the four pollutants and regular consumption of vegetables, fruits and soy. The effects of PM10, NO2 and O3 were significant smaller in the subjects who regularly consumed fruits than those who never or seldom consumed such food. The effect modification of soy consumption on PM 10, NO 2 and SO 2 associated mortality was also found statistically significant. However, regular consumption of dairy products was associated with significant increased effects of PM 10 and NO 2. Conclusions This study provides insight into dietary habit as one of the modifiers of health effects of air pollution. Our findings merit further studies to characterise the influence of diet on air pollution-related health and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2012, v. 66 n. 3, p. 254-258 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2009.103275
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8451366
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech.2009.103275
 
dc.identifier.epage258
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198829
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300039600010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee631012
Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health
Hong Kong Health Care Promotion Fund215032
Funding Information:

The authors thank the Department of Health and Environmental Protection Department of Hong Kong for data and assistance. The authors would also like to thank the Hong Kong Health Services Research Committee (#631012) and Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health for funding the Hong Kong Lifestyle and Mortality study from which the data of this study were derived.

 
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X
2013 Impact Factor: 3.294
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid20884669
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857190242
 
dc.identifier.spage254
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145970
 
dc.identifier.volume66
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
 
dc.relation.projectImpact of air pollution on premature deaths in Hong Kong
 
dc.relation.projectA mega-case-control study (20,000 deaths and 30,000 controls) on smoking and mortality in Hong Kong
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
 
dc.subject.meshDiet - ethnology
 
dc.subject.meshMortality
 
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter - adverse effects
 
dc.titleDietary habits and the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality in the Chinese population in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Schooling, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yang, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hedley, AJ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background Both diet and air pollution are associated with mortality risks. However, no epidemiological study has examined the potential interaction between diet and air pollution on mortality. We assessed their interaction on an additive scale. Methods We analysed the data on daily concentrations of ambient air pollutants (PM 10, NO 2, SO 2 and O 3) and a total of 23 484 deaths in 1998 in Hong Kong. A standardised questionnaire was used in all four death registries to collect food frequency data from proxy respondents while waiting for the registration to be completed. We fitted a linear odds ratio model and estimated excess relative risk due to the interaction (ERRI) between air pollution and regular consumption (at least once per week) of each food item to measure departure from additivity of effects on mortality. Results We observed consistently negative ERRI between all of the four pollutants and regular consumption of vegetables, fruits and soy. The effects of PM10, NO2 and O3 were significant smaller in the subjects who regularly consumed fruits than those who never or seldom consumed such food. The effect modification of soy consumption on PM 10, NO 2 and SO 2 associated mortality was also found statistically significant. However, regular consumption of dairy products was associated with significant increased effects of PM 10 and NO 2. Conclusions This study provides insight into dietary habit as one of the modifiers of health effects of air pollution. Our findings merit further studies to characterise the influence of diet on air pollution-related health and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Southern Medical University
  2. The University of Hong Kong