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Article: Risk of second primary malignancy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with radioactive iodine therapy

TitleRisk of second primary malignancy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with radioactive iodine therapy
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surg
Citation
Surgery (United States), 2012, v. 151 n. 6, p. 844-850 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Differentiated thyroid cancer survivors are at increased risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy, but the cause remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between radioiodine therapy and risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy and to examine whether the risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy in differentiated thyroid cancer survivors treated with radioiodine therapy is increased relative to the general population. Methods: Among 895 radiation-naïve patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, 643 (71.8%) received ≥1 course of radioiodine therapy (radioiodine therapy-positive group) and 252 (28.2%) received no radioiodine therapy (radioiodine therapy-negative group). After a median follow-up of 93.5 months (range, 23.4-570.8), 64 (7.2%) patients developed ≥1 nonsynchronous second primary malignancy. Potential risk factors for nonsynchronous second primary malignancy were entered into a multivariable regression model and cancer incidence in the radioiodine therapy-positive and -negative groups were compared to that of the general population by estimating the standardized incidence ratios. Results: The 20-year cumulative nonsynchronous second primary malignancy risk in radioiodine therapy-positive group was significantly higher than radioiodine therapy-negative group (13.5% vs 3.1%; P =.015). Cumulative radioiodine therapy activity of 3.0 to 8.9 GBq (relative risk, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.079-7.154; P =.034) was the only independent risk factor for nonsynchronous second primary malignancy after adjusting for age, sex, period of differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosis, and stage of differentiated thyroid cancer. For females, the standardized incidence ratio in the radioiodine therapy-positive group was 1.54 (95% CI, 1.11-2.08) and in the radioiodine therapy-negative group it was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.37-1.90). Conclusion: Differentiated thyroid cancer female survivors treated by radioiodine therapy appeared to be at elevated risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy when compared to the general population and this risk was not apparent in those not previously treated by radioiodine therapy. © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145955
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.620
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLang, BHHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, IOLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:03:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgery (United States), 2012, v. 151 n. 6, p. 844-850en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0039-6060en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145955-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Differentiated thyroid cancer survivors are at increased risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy, but the cause remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between radioiodine therapy and risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy and to examine whether the risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy in differentiated thyroid cancer survivors treated with radioiodine therapy is increased relative to the general population. Methods: Among 895 radiation-naïve patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, 643 (71.8%) received ≥1 course of radioiodine therapy (radioiodine therapy-positive group) and 252 (28.2%) received no radioiodine therapy (radioiodine therapy-negative group). After a median follow-up of 93.5 months (range, 23.4-570.8), 64 (7.2%) patients developed ≥1 nonsynchronous second primary malignancy. Potential risk factors for nonsynchronous second primary malignancy were entered into a multivariable regression model and cancer incidence in the radioiodine therapy-positive and -negative groups were compared to that of the general population by estimating the standardized incidence ratios. Results: The 20-year cumulative nonsynchronous second primary malignancy risk in radioiodine therapy-positive group was significantly higher than radioiodine therapy-negative group (13.5% vs 3.1%; P =.015). Cumulative radioiodine therapy activity of 3.0 to 8.9 GBq (relative risk, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.079-7.154; P =.034) was the only independent risk factor for nonsynchronous second primary malignancy after adjusting for age, sex, period of differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosis, and stage of differentiated thyroid cancer. For females, the standardized incidence ratio in the radioiodine therapy-positive group was 1.54 (95% CI, 1.11-2.08) and in the radioiodine therapy-negative group it was 0.92 (95% CI, 0.37-1.90). Conclusion: Differentiated thyroid cancer female survivors treated by radioiodine therapy appeared to be at elevated risk of nonsynchronous second primary malignancy when compared to the general population and this risk was not apparent in those not previously treated by radioiodine therapy. © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgery (United States)en_HK
dc.subject.meshIodine Radioisotopes - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshThyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleRisk of second primary malignancy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with radioactive iodine therapyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, IOL: iolwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IOL=rp01806en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surg.2011.12.019en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22341041-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861594243en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198982en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861594243&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume151en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage844en_HK
dc.identifier.epage850en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305168200012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, BHH=7201907327en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, IOL=7102513940en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KP=37125734900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, KY=7102748975en_HK

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