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Article: Surgeons' static posture and movement repetitions in open and laparoscopic surgery

TitleSurgeons' static posture and movement repetitions in open and laparoscopic surgery
Authors
Keywordslaparoscopic
movement
open surgery
posture
surgeons
work-related musculoskeletal disorders
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jsre
Citation
Journal Of Surgical Research, 2012, v. 172 n. 1, p. e19-e31 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background: There is increasing concern about the surgeon maintaining a static posture during laparoscopic surgery, which can contribute to musculoskeletal disorders. A series of studies are being conducted in Hong Kong examining the surgeons' real-time movements and electromyography in the operating theater during different operations. The present paper examines the postures and movements of surgeons during real-time open and laparoscopic procedures. Materials and Methods: Fourteen surgeons participated in the study (12 men, 2 women). Cervical spine movements were measured using a biaxial inclinometer attached to the surgeon's head via a headband. Biaxial electrogoniometers were attached to the surgeon's bilateral shoulder joints. Real-time joint movements in sagittal and coronal planes were recorded during open and laparoscopic surgeries for periods ranging from 30 to 80 min. Results: Surgeons generally maintained a flexed neck posture during open surgery and a more extended neck posture during laparoscopic procedures. There were statistically significant differences in mean neck posture and mean left shoulder abduction posture between the two types of surgery. Laparoscopic procedures showed a trend for longer duration in static posture in the neck, while open procedures showed trends for higher frequencies of movements. Conclusions: This study presented a novel approach to quantify the physical workload of surgeons using biomechanical parameters to describe duration of static posture and repetitiveness of movements. Results showed that long durations of static postures in laparoscopic surgery were closely associated with low-level muscle tension, which may contribute to an increased risk of surgeons developing musculoskeletal disorders. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145949
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.121
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, GPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, SWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, JTCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTing, ACWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, RCCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, Pen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:03:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:03:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Surgical Research, 2012, v. 172 n. 1, p. e19-e31en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-4804en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145949-
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is increasing concern about the surgeon maintaining a static posture during laparoscopic surgery, which can contribute to musculoskeletal disorders. A series of studies are being conducted in Hong Kong examining the surgeons' real-time movements and electromyography in the operating theater during different operations. The present paper examines the postures and movements of surgeons during real-time open and laparoscopic procedures. Materials and Methods: Fourteen surgeons participated in the study (12 men, 2 women). Cervical spine movements were measured using a biaxial inclinometer attached to the surgeon's head via a headband. Biaxial electrogoniometers were attached to the surgeon's bilateral shoulder joints. Real-time joint movements in sagittal and coronal planes were recorded during open and laparoscopic surgeries for periods ranging from 30 to 80 min. Results: Surgeons generally maintained a flexed neck posture during open surgery and a more extended neck posture during laparoscopic procedures. There were statistically significant differences in mean neck posture and mean left shoulder abduction posture between the two types of surgery. Laparoscopic procedures showed a trend for longer duration in static posture in the neck, while open procedures showed trends for higher frequencies of movements. Conclusions: This study presented a novel approach to quantify the physical workload of surgeons using biomechanical parameters to describe duration of static posture and repetitiveness of movements. Results showed that long durations of static postures in laparoscopic surgery were closely associated with low-level muscle tension, which may contribute to an increased risk of surgeons developing musculoskeletal disorders. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jsreen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Surgical Researchen_HK
dc.subjectlaparoscopicen_HK
dc.subjectmovementen_HK
dc.subjectopen surgeryen_HK
dc.subjectpostureen_HK
dc.subjectsurgeonsen_HK
dc.subjectwork-related musculoskeletal disordersen_HK
dc.subject.meshDigestive System Surgical Procedures-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy-
dc.subject.meshMovement - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPhysicians-
dc.subject.meshPosture - physiology-
dc.titleSurgeons' static posture and movement repetitions in open and laparoscopic surgeryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, SWK: wkcheng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, JTC: tcjensen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, SWK=rp00374en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, JTC=rp01603en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jss.2011.08.004en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22079837en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82955236095en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198823en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82955236095&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume172en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee19en_HK
dc.identifier.epagee31en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208906800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSzeto, GPY=8927033800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, SWK=7404684779en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, JTC=7005903722en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTing, ACW=7102858552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, RCC=7102940061en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, P=24469553100en_HK

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