File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The use of analogy in speech motor performance

TitleThe use of analogy in speech motor performance
Authors
KeywordsAcoustic analysis
Acoustic correlates of pitch variation
Analogy instruction
Implicit motor learning
Speech production
Issue Date2012
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/loi/asl
Citation
International Journal Of Speech-Language Pathology, 2012, v. 14 n. 1, p. 84-90 How to Cite?
AbstractThe acoustic correlates of pitch variation were examined in 40 participants who received analogy instructions or explicit instructions that required them to modulate their intonation during speech production. First, using focus group methodology, professional speech-language pathologists were asked to identify analogies that best described minimum pitch variation (monotone), moderate pitch variation (normal intonation), and maximum pitch variation (exaggerated intonation) in speech. The focus group established that an appropriate pitch variation metaphor may be related to imagery of "waves at sea", with minimum pitch variation represented by a flat calm sea, moderate pitch variation represented by a moderate sea, and maximum pitch variation represented by a choppy sea. Forty adult participants without speech impairments were asked to read aloud a standard paragraph using their habitual pitch variation (control condition). They were then allocated randomly to an analogy or an explicit instruction group and were asked to read aloud different paragraphs with minimum, moderate, or maximum pitch variations. Results revealed that acoustic correlates of pitch variation (standard deviation of fundamental frequency, SDF0) were not different for the control condition, or moderate and maximum pitch variation conditions in the two groups. However, the analogy instruction was significantly more effective than the explicit instruction for inducing minimum pitch variation. Analysis of participants in each group who showed higher than normal pitch variation in the control condition (>.5 SD above the group SDF0) revealed that the analogy instruction was more effective than the explicit instruction in the minimum variation condition. It was concluded that analogy instructions may be a useful tool in speech rehabilitation. © 2012 The Speech Pathology Association of Australia Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145948
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.543
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, ACYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, EPMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:02:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:02:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Speech-Language Pathology, 2012, v. 14 n. 1, p. 84-90en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1754-9515en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145948-
dc.description.abstractThe acoustic correlates of pitch variation were examined in 40 participants who received analogy instructions or explicit instructions that required them to modulate their intonation during speech production. First, using focus group methodology, professional speech-language pathologists were asked to identify analogies that best described minimum pitch variation (monotone), moderate pitch variation (normal intonation), and maximum pitch variation (exaggerated intonation) in speech. The focus group established that an appropriate pitch variation metaphor may be related to imagery of "waves at sea", with minimum pitch variation represented by a flat calm sea, moderate pitch variation represented by a moderate sea, and maximum pitch variation represented by a choppy sea. Forty adult participants without speech impairments were asked to read aloud a standard paragraph using their habitual pitch variation (control condition). They were then allocated randomly to an analogy or an explicit instruction group and were asked to read aloud different paragraphs with minimum, moderate, or maximum pitch variations. Results revealed that acoustic correlates of pitch variation (standard deviation of fundamental frequency, SDF0) were not different for the control condition, or moderate and maximum pitch variation conditions in the two groups. However, the analogy instruction was significantly more effective than the explicit instruction for inducing minimum pitch variation. Analysis of participants in each group who showed higher than normal pitch variation in the control condition (>.5 SD above the group SDF0) revealed that the analogy instruction was more effective than the explicit instruction in the minimum variation condition. It was concluded that analogy instructions may be a useful tool in speech rehabilitation. © 2012 The Speech Pathology Association of Australia Limited.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/loi/aslen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.en_US
dc.subjectAcoustic analysisen_HK
dc.subjectAcoustic correlates of pitch variationen_HK
dc.subjectAnalogy instructionen_HK
dc.subjectImplicit motor learningen_HK
dc.subjectSpeech productionen_HK
dc.subject.meshImagery (Psychotherapy)-
dc.subject.meshMetaphor-
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Acoustics-
dc.subject.meshVoice Quality-
dc.titleThe use of analogy in speech motor performanceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, TL: tara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMa, EPM: estella1@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, TL=rp00970en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMa, EPM=rp00933en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/17549507.2011.616600en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22070672-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856101826en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198816en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros230957-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856101826&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage84en_HK
dc.identifier.epage90en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299282900008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, ACY=54913984700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehill, TL=7004098633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, EPM=7202039872en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats