File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Social network characteristics and salivary cortisol in healthy older people

TitleSocial network characteristics and salivary cortisol in healthy older people
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe ScientificWorld Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/
Citation
TheScientificWorldJournal, 2012, v. 2012, article no. 929067 How to Cite?
AbstractPsychobiological research on aging in humans has been confounded by individual differences that have not been adequately characterized in the literature. This paper is an attempt to shed light on this issue by examining the impact of social network characteristics predictive of successful aging on salivary cortisol among 78 older Chinese people in Hong Kong. Eight salivary cortisol samples were collected each day for two consecutive days from immediately after awakening to 12 hours later. Two components of the cortisol diurnal cycle, response to awakening and diurnal decline, were examined in relation to social network characteristics including size, emotional support, and cultivation. ANOVAs with repeated measured were run to examine influences of the three social network characteristics on the cortisol awakening response and diurnal decline, with the effects of gender, age, socioeconomic status, and waking time controlled. Results indicated that those who spent more time and effort in developing and strengthening their social ties (i.e., those high in 'cultivation') exhibited a significantly greater rise in cortisol in the morning and a significantly steeper decline over the day, thus attesting to more effective activation and deactivation of the HPA axis. Network cultivation reflected a positive motivation to nurture social relationships more than the other two network characteristics. Its effect on cortisol might stem from the positivity underlying the motivation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145947
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.219
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.315
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
City UniversitySRG-Fd 7002199
Funding Information:

Support of this paper was provided by a City University Research Grant (project no. SRG-Fd 7002199). Parts of the data reported in this paper have been presented at the 11th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine, 5 August 2010, Washington, DC, US. The authors are grateful to Miss Trista Chan for her assistance in data collection and field work.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, JCLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChong, AMLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSiu, OTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:02:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:02:36Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTheScientificWorldJournal, 2012, v. 2012, article no. 929067en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1537-744Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145947-
dc.description.abstractPsychobiological research on aging in humans has been confounded by individual differences that have not been adequately characterized in the literature. This paper is an attempt to shed light on this issue by examining the impact of social network characteristics predictive of successful aging on salivary cortisol among 78 older Chinese people in Hong Kong. Eight salivary cortisol samples were collected each day for two consecutive days from immediately after awakening to 12 hours later. Two components of the cortisol diurnal cycle, response to awakening and diurnal decline, were examined in relation to social network characteristics including size, emotional support, and cultivation. ANOVAs with repeated measured were run to examine influences of the three social network characteristics on the cortisol awakening response and diurnal decline, with the effects of gender, age, socioeconomic status, and waking time controlled. Results indicated that those who spent more time and effort in developing and strengthening their social ties (i.e., those high in 'cultivation') exhibited a significantly greater rise in cortisol in the morning and a significantly steeper decline over the day, thus attesting to more effective activation and deactivation of the HPA axis. Network cultivation reflected a positive motivation to nurture social relationships more than the other two network characteristics. Its effect on cortisol might stem from the positivity underlying the motivation.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe ScientificWorld Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTheScientificWorldJournalen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong-
dc.subject.meshHydrocortisone - analysis-
dc.subject.meshSaliva - chemistry-
dc.subject.meshSocial Class-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.titleSocial network characteristics and salivary cortisol in healthy older peopleen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1100/2012/929067en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22489206-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3317671-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859786377en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros199106en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros202363-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859786377&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume2012en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303023400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEvans, P=7402236303en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiu, OT=36748208400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChong, AML=35942383100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, JCL=7401939442en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats