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Article: A public trust doctrine for Hong Kong

TitleA public trust doctrine for Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCommon law
Jurisprudence
Natural resources
Environmental protection
Issue Date2011
PublisherUniversity of Auckland, Faculty of Law.
Citation
New Zealand Journal of Environmental Law, 2011, v. 15, p. 89-111 How to Cite?
AbstractThe public trust doctrine is a traditional common law principle stating that certain resources are common property, and that the state is legally obligated to control and manage them for the welfare of the public, subject only to the paramount and reasonable needs of other users. This article explores the enforceability of the public trust doctrine in common law and its possible recognition in Hong Kong. This doctrine is controversial. This article first investigates the evolution of the doctrine. Secondly, it discusses the limits of private property rights. Thirdly, it analyses the common law jurisprudence in determining whether a trust obligation can be imposed on the state. The fundamental issue is whether the people have an inherent or vested right to the use and enjoyment of natural resources. A stronger case can be made when there is a constitutional home for the doctrine. Fourthly, this article surveys the common law jurisdictions which recognise this doctrine. By way of conclusion, the role of the judiciary in environmental protection will be discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145930
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsu, BFCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:02:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:02:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Journal of Environmental Law, 2011, v. 15, p. 89-111en_US
dc.identifier.issn1174-1538-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145930-
dc.description.abstractThe public trust doctrine is a traditional common law principle stating that certain resources are common property, and that the state is legally obligated to control and manage them for the welfare of the public, subject only to the paramount and reasonable needs of other users. This article explores the enforceability of the public trust doctrine in common law and its possible recognition in Hong Kong. This doctrine is controversial. This article first investigates the evolution of the doctrine. Secondly, it discusses the limits of private property rights. Thirdly, it analyses the common law jurisprudence in determining whether a trust obligation can be imposed on the state. The fundamental issue is whether the people have an inherent or vested right to the use and enjoyment of natural resources. A stronger case can be made when there is a constitutional home for the doctrine. Fourthly, this article surveys the common law jurisdictions which recognise this doctrine. By way of conclusion, the role of the judiciary in environmental protection will be discussed.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Auckland, Faculty of Law.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofNew Zealand Journal of Environmental Lawen_US
dc.subjectCommon law-
dc.subjectJurisprudence-
dc.subjectNatural resources-
dc.subjectEnvironmental protection-
dc.titleA public trust doctrine for Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHsu, BFC: bhsu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHsu, BFC=rp01002en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros198976en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros184805-
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.spage89en_US
dc.identifier.epage111en_US
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealand-

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