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Article: Pubertal muscle mass and diabetes markers in Chinese adolescents

TitlePubertal muscle mass and diabetes markers in Chinese adolescents
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/
Citation
American Journal Of Human Biology, 2012, v. 24 n. 2, p. 183-185 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Diabetes is common in China despite a relatively nonobese population. We hypothesized that testosterone driven muscle mass acquisition at puberty may be relevant. We examined the associations of testosterone with muscle mass and of muscle mass with fasting glucose in Chinese adolescents. Methods: In 40 adolescents (20 boys and 20 girls, age 12.9 ± 0.1 years) from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohort, we used multivariable linear regression to assess adjusted associations of testosterone and fasting glucose (from a morning blood sample) with muscle and fat mass from a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Results: Testosterone was positively associated with muscle mass (0.05 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.09, per pg/ml testosterone). Muscle mass was associated with lower glucose (-0.04 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.08 to -0.01 per kg muscle mass) adjusted for sex and fat mass. Conclusions: Environmentally driven muscle mass acquisition at puberty could influence diabetes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145910
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 1.700
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.850
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health Care and Promotion Fund
Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of Hong Kong216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund03040771
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong, RFCID06060592
Government of the Hong Kong SAR
University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme of Public Health Granted Research
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study was originally supported by Health Care and Promotion Fund, Health and Welfare Bureau, Government of Hong Kong; Contract grant number: HCPF #216106. It was further supported by Health and Health Services Research Fund; Contract grant number: HHSRF #03040771, Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases in Hong Kong, RFCID #06060592, Government of the Hong Kong SAR and the University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme of Public Health Granted Research, The University of Hong Kong.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, MAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:01:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:01:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Human Biology, 2012, v. 24 n. 2, p. 183-185en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1042-0533en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145910-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Diabetes is common in China despite a relatively nonobese population. We hypothesized that testosterone driven muscle mass acquisition at puberty may be relevant. We examined the associations of testosterone with muscle mass and of muscle mass with fasting glucose in Chinese adolescents. Methods: In 40 adolescents (20 boys and 20 girls, age 12.9 ± 0.1 years) from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohort, we used multivariable linear regression to assess adjusted associations of testosterone and fasting glucose (from a morning blood sample) with muscle and fat mass from a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Results: Testosterone was positively associated with muscle mass (0.05 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.09, per pg/ml testosterone). Muscle mass was associated with lower glucose (-0.04 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.08 to -0.01 per kg muscle mass) adjusted for sex and fat mass. Conclusions: Environmentally driven muscle mass acquisition at puberty could influence diabetes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1042-0533/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Human Biologyen_HK
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Human Biology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subject.meshBody Composition - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal - anatomy and histology - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPuberty - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshTestosterone - blooden_HK
dc.titlePubertal muscle mass and diabetes markers in Chinese adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajhb.22210en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22287498-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862786770en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198830en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862786770&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume24en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage183en_HK
dc.identifier.epage185en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299997500013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectImpact of breastfeeding on hospitalizations from infectious diseases in Hong Kong Chinese children up to eight years of age-
dc.relation.projectShort- and medium-term outcomes of accelerated infant growth in Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, SL=54383821500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SL=55261803900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAu Yeung, SL=8871840600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, MA=8966350200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK

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