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Book Chapter: Geographical information systems

TitleGeographical information systems
Authors
KeywordsTraffic engineering -- Information technology.
Geographic information systems.
Traffic safety.
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Geographical information systems. In Li, G and Baker, SP (Eds.), Injury research: theories, methods, and approaches, p. 447-464. New York, NY: Springer, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractUnlike contagious diseases such as influenza, injury is not spatially contagious. Yet, its occurrence is clearly influenced by locational factors. Reducing injury has to do with understanding the underlying spatial relationships beyond simple mapping. With geographic information systems (GIS) and other information technologies, researchers can now integrate large quantities of both spatial and nonspatial data and examine underlying relationships through hypothesis testing. In this chapter, we first introduce different types of GIS-based spatial analysis methods for crash analysis and prevention. Then, we introduce a GIS-based network analysis approach for the identification of hazardous road locations. Finally, we conclude by suggesting ways forward for better utilizing the spatial data and spatial modeling capacities to reduce traffic injury.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145650
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLoo, BPYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYao, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T02:00:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T02:00:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeographical information systems. In Li, G and Baker, SP (Eds.), Injury research: theories, methods, and approaches, p. 447-464. New York, NY: Springer, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781461415985en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145650-
dc.description.abstractUnlike contagious diseases such as influenza, injury is not spatially contagious. Yet, its occurrence is clearly influenced by locational factors. Reducing injury has to do with understanding the underlying spatial relationships beyond simple mapping. With geographic information systems (GIS) and other information technologies, researchers can now integrate large quantities of both spatial and nonspatial data and examine underlying relationships through hypothesis testing. In this chapter, we first introduce different types of GIS-based spatial analysis methods for crash analysis and prevention. Then, we introduce a GIS-based network analysis approach for the identification of hazardous road locations. Finally, we conclude by suggesting ways forward for better utilizing the spatial data and spatial modeling capacities to reduce traffic injury.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofInjury research: theories, methods, and approachesen_US
dc.subjectTraffic engineering -- Information technology.-
dc.subjectGeographic information systems.-
dc.subjectTraffic safety.-
dc.titleGeographical information systemsen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLoo, BPY: bpyloo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLoo, BPY=rp00608en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4614-1599-2_24-
dc.identifier.hkuros198636en_US
dc.identifier.spage447en_US
dc.identifier.epage464en_US
dc.publisher.placeNew York, NYen_US
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 130823-

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