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Article: Physical activity of young children

TitlePhysical activity of young children
Authors
KeywordsActivity
Health promotion
Young children
Issue Date2006
PublisherSlack Incorporated. The Journal's website is located at http://www.otjronline.com
Citation
OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 2006, v. 26 n. 1, p. 4-14 How to Cite?
AbstractOccupational therapists concerned with the long-term health and welfare of children need to be aware of the decline in physical activity of children in most Western societies. The current study examined the extent of physical activity in the lives of 50 Australian children with a mean age of 7.74 years through questionnaires completed by the children's parents and pedometer (step) data collected from the children during 4 days. The current data show that higher self-perception of physical competence, child's levels of physical skill, and low parental perception of peer teasing were the best predictors of physical activity. Higher family socioeconomic status was found to be a significant predictor of more steps being taken on weekends, and partner's (usually a father's) level of exercise was an important predictor of the number of weekend steps. Children who were perceived to experience more peer teasing completed fewer steps on the weekend. The findings from this study indicate that children's physical activity levels may depend on the availability of family resources, and that children in their early school years may already experience negative effects from teasing that, combined with reduced self-confidence, may lay the foundation for their withdrawing from physical activity as they get older.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145600
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.524
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZiviani, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorRodger, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBatch, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T01:57:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T01:57:26Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationOTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 2006, v. 26 n. 1, p. 4-14en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1539-4492en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145600-
dc.description.abstractOccupational therapists concerned with the long-term health and welfare of children need to be aware of the decline in physical activity of children in most Western societies. The current study examined the extent of physical activity in the lives of 50 Australian children with a mean age of 7.74 years through questionnaires completed by the children's parents and pedometer (step) data collected from the children during 4 days. The current data show that higher self-perception of physical competence, child's levels of physical skill, and low parental perception of peer teasing were the best predictors of physical activity. Higher family socioeconomic status was found to be a significant predictor of more steps being taken on weekends, and partner's (usually a father's) level of exercise was an important predictor of the number of weekend steps. Children who were perceived to experience more peer teasing completed fewer steps on the weekend. The findings from this study indicate that children's physical activity levels may depend on the availability of family resources, and that children in their early school years may already experience negative effects from teasing that, combined with reduced self-confidence, may lay the foundation for their withdrawing from physical activity as they get older.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSlack Incorporated. The Journal's website is located at http://www.otjronline.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOTJR: Occupation, Participation and Healthen_HK
dc.subjectActivityen_HK
dc.subjectHealth promotionen_HK
dc.subjectYoung childrenen_HK
dc.titlePhysical activity of young childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645558223en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros116001en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645558223&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume26en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4en_HK
dc.identifier.epage14en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234614400002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZiviani, J=6603664282en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacdonald, D=7401463393en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJenkins, D=7401557589en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRodger, S=7005081814en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBatch, J=7004278409en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK

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