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Article: Who wants a slimmer body? the relationship between body weight status, education level and body shape dissatisfaction among young adults in Hong Kong

TitleWho wants a slimmer body? the relationship between body weight status, education level and body shape dissatisfaction among young adults in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2011, v. 11, article no. 835 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Body shape dissatisfaction has been thought to have an indispensable impact on weight control behaviors. We investigated the prevalence of body shape dissatisfaction (BSD) and explored its association with weight status, education level and other determinants among young adults in Hong Kong. Methods. Information on anthropometry, BSD, and socio-demographics was collected from a random sample of 1205 young adults (611 men and 594 women) aged 18-27 in a community-based household survey. BSD was defined as a discrepancy between current and ideal body shape based on a figure rating scale. Cross-tabulations, homogeneity tests and logistic regression models were applied. Results: The percentages of underweight men and women were 16.5% and 34.9% respectively, and the corresponding percentages of being overweight or obese were 26.7% and 13.2% for men and women respectively. Three-quarters of young adults had BSD. Among women, 30.9% of those underweight and 75.5% of those with normal weight desired a slimmer body shape. Overweight men and underweight women with lower education level were more likely to have a mismatch between weight status and BSD than those with higher education level. After controlling for other determinants, underweight women were found to have a higher likelihood to maintain their current body shapes than other women. Men were found to be less likely to have a mismatch between weight status and BSD than women. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity in men and underweight in women were prevalent among Hong Kong young adults. Inappropriate body shape desire might predispose individuals to unhealthy weight loss or gain behaviors. Careful consideration of actual weight status in body shape desire is needed in health promotion and education, especially for underweight and normal weight women and those with a low education level. © 2011 Cheung et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145589
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YTDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, ETSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, SYSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T01:56:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T01:56:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2011, v. 11, article no. 835en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145589-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Body shape dissatisfaction has been thought to have an indispensable impact on weight control behaviors. We investigated the prevalence of body shape dissatisfaction (BSD) and explored its association with weight status, education level and other determinants among young adults in Hong Kong. Methods. Information on anthropometry, BSD, and socio-demographics was collected from a random sample of 1205 young adults (611 men and 594 women) aged 18-27 in a community-based household survey. BSD was defined as a discrepancy between current and ideal body shape based on a figure rating scale. Cross-tabulations, homogeneity tests and logistic regression models were applied. Results: The percentages of underweight men and women were 16.5% and 34.9% respectively, and the corresponding percentages of being overweight or obese were 26.7% and 13.2% for men and women respectively. Three-quarters of young adults had BSD. Among women, 30.9% of those underweight and 75.5% of those with normal weight desired a slimmer body shape. Overweight men and underweight women with lower education level were more likely to have a mismatch between weight status and BSD than those with higher education level. After controlling for other determinants, underweight women were found to have a higher likelihood to maintain their current body shapes than other women. Men were found to be less likely to have a mismatch between weight status and BSD than women. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity in men and underweight in women were prevalent among Hong Kong young adults. Inappropriate body shape desire might predispose individuals to unhealthy weight loss or gain behaviors. Careful consideration of actual weight status in body shape desire is needed in health promotion and education, especially for underweight and normal weight women and those with a low education level. © 2011 Cheung et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry-
dc.subject.meshBody Image-
dc.subject.meshData Collection-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong-
dc.subject.meshThinness - psychology-
dc.titleWho wants a slimmer body? the relationship between body weight status, education level and body shape dissatisfaction among young adults in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM: amlee@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, ETS: etsli@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, ETS=rp00737en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-11-835en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22039977-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3305917-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80055024602en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198776en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros225132-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80055024602&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297682500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YTD=16635396700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ETS=14018169600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, SYS=11639038000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9980639-

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