File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Determination of ultra light weight masses using AFM and FIB technology

TitleDetermination of ultra light weight masses using AFM and FIB technology
Authors
KeywordsAtomic force microscope
Effective mass
Focused ion beam technology
Animal Albumin
Cantilever beams
Issue Date2011
PublisherHong Kong Institution of Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkie.org.hk/html/publications/transactions/index.asp
Citation
HKIE Transactions, 2011, v. 18 n. 3, p. 22-26 How to Cite?
AbstractAtomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has evolved as a powerful tool to resolve topographic information of specimens at the nano-scale level. The operating principle of an AFM makes use of the signal detected from the cantilever tip, which may either be a direct measure of the deflection of a laser beam or changes in the frequency of vibration when it interacts with the specimen. The use of the AFM cantilever to measure ultra-light weight masses using a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) deposition technology is demonstrated in this paper. The FIB deposited tungsten was found to contain a significant concentration of gallium from the process. The position of the deposit on the cantilever beam is crucial and is shown to alter significantly the spring constant k and the effective mass of the beam. To illustrate the potential of the technique, a sample of albumin was measured.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145562
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.145

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, CKYen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrimer, REJen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, YYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T01:54:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T01:54:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationHKIE Transactions, 2011, v. 18 n. 3, p. 22-26en_US
dc.identifier.issn1023-697X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145562-
dc.description.abstractAtomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has evolved as a powerful tool to resolve topographic information of specimens at the nano-scale level. The operating principle of an AFM makes use of the signal detected from the cantilever tip, which may either be a direct measure of the deflection of a laser beam or changes in the frequency of vibration when it interacts with the specimen. The use of the AFM cantilever to measure ultra-light weight masses using a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) deposition technology is demonstrated in this paper. The FIB deposited tungsten was found to contain a significant concentration of gallium from the process. The position of the deposit on the cantilever beam is crucial and is shown to alter significantly the spring constant k and the effective mass of the beam. To illustrate the potential of the technique, a sample of albumin was measured.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Institution of Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkie.org.hk/html/publications/transactions/index.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofHKIE Transactionsen_US
dc.subjectAtomic force microscope-
dc.subjectEffective mass-
dc.subjectFocused ion beam technology-
dc.subjectAnimal Albumin-
dc.subjectCantilever beams-
dc.titleDetermination of ultra light weight masses using AFM and FIB technologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, CKY: kycng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNg, CKY=rp01365en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80155201526-
dc.identifier.hkuros198721en_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage22en_US
dc.identifier.epage26en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats