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Conference Paper: A comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral midazolam for premedication in pediatric anesthesia: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial

TitleA comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral midazolam for premedication in pediatric anesthesia: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.org
Citation
2007 Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. In Anesthesia And Analgesia, 2008, v. 106 n. 6, p. 1715-1721 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Midazolam is the most commonly used premedication in children. It has been shown to be more effective than parental presence or placebo in reducing anxiety and improving compliance at induction of anesthesia. Clonidine, an α2 agonist, has been suggested as an alternative. Dexmedetomidine is a more α2 selective drug with more favorable pharmacokinetic properties than clonidine. We designed this prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial to evaluate whether intranasal dexmedetomidine is as effective as oral midazolam for premedication in children. METHODS: Ninety-six children of ASA physical status I or II scheduled for elective minor surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group M received midazolam 0.5 mg/kg in acetaminophen syrup and intranasal placebo. Group D0.5 and Group D1 received intranasal dexmedetomidine 0.5 or 1 μg/kg, respectively, and acetaminophen syrup. Patients' sedation status, behavior scores, blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded by an observer until induction of anesthesia. Recovery characteristics were also recorded. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in parental separation acceptance, behavior score at induction and wake-up behavior score. When compared with group M, patients in group D0.5 and D1 were significantly more sedated when they were separated from their parents (P < 0.001). Patients from group D1 were significantly more sedated at induction of anesthesia when compared with group M (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Intranasal dexmedetomidine produces more sedation than oral midazolam, but with similar and acceptable cooperation. © 2008 International Anesthesia Research Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145548
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.523
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYuen, VMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T01:53:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T01:53:20Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citation2007 Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. In Anesthesia And Analgesia, 2008, v. 106 n. 6, p. 1715-1721en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0003-2999en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145548-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Midazolam is the most commonly used premedication in children. It has been shown to be more effective than parental presence or placebo in reducing anxiety and improving compliance at induction of anesthesia. Clonidine, an α2 agonist, has been suggested as an alternative. Dexmedetomidine is a more α2 selective drug with more favorable pharmacokinetic properties than clonidine. We designed this prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial to evaluate whether intranasal dexmedetomidine is as effective as oral midazolam for premedication in children. METHODS: Ninety-six children of ASA physical status I or II scheduled for elective minor surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group M received midazolam 0.5 mg/kg in acetaminophen syrup and intranasal placebo. Group D0.5 and Group D1 received intranasal dexmedetomidine 0.5 or 1 μg/kg, respectively, and acetaminophen syrup. Patients' sedation status, behavior scores, blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded by an observer until induction of anesthesia. Recovery characteristics were also recorded. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in parental separation acceptance, behavior score at induction and wake-up behavior score. When compared with group M, patients in group D0.5 and D1 were significantly more sedated when they were separated from their parents (P < 0.001). Patients from group D1 were significantly more sedated at induction of anesthesia when compared with group M (P = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: Intranasal dexmedetomidine produces more sedation than oral midazolam, but with similar and acceptable cooperation. © 2008 International Anesthesia Research Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnesthesia and Analgesiaen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdrenergic alpha-Agonists - administration and dosage-
dc.subject.meshChild Behavior - drug effects-
dc.subject.meshConsciousness - drug effects-
dc.subject.meshDexmedetomidine - administration and dosage-
dc.subject.meshHypnotics and Sedatives - administration and dosage-
dc.titleA comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral midazolam for premedication in pediatric anesthesia: A double-blinded randomized controlled trialen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1213/ane.0b013e31816c8929en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18499600-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-44649137953en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros152097en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-44649137953&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume106en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1715en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1721en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256075200017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.f10001474958-
dc.identifier.citeulike9782462-

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