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Article: Personal protection equipment for biological hazards: Does it affect tracheal intubation performance?

TitlePersonal protection equipment for biological hazards: Does it affect tracheal intubation performance?
Authors
KeywordsBiological hazard
Flexible bronchoscopy
Intubating laryngeal mask
Personal protection equipment
Tracheal intubation
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resuscitation
Citation
Resuscitation, 2007, v. 74 n. 1, p. 119-126 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Personal protection equipment (PPE) is recommended for use during airway management of patients with highly contagious respiratory tract illness. While its use in chemical hazards and its effect on airway management has been assessed previously, there has been no research assessing whether this equipment affects the ability to perform tracheal intubation. It is the intention of this investigation to answer this question. Methods: Eighteen workers at various level of training were asked to wear three different types of PPE while performing four different types of tracheal intubation. The PPE used included the eye shield, face shield and the Dustmaster™. The intubation techniques were direct laryngoscopy, intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask (Fastrach™) and flexible bronchoscopy using the eyepiece and an eyepiece with camera attached. We assessed the time to intubate as well as the incidence of oesophageal intubation. A short questionnaire was used to examine participants' subjective experiences of wearing the various types of PPE. Results: There was no significant effect on the time to intubation for any of the methods studied. However, all subjects found that the face shield was uncomfortably hot to wear. Fibreoptic bronchoscopic intubation using the eyepiece was particularly difficult with all of the PPE used due to the distance of the subjects' eye from the eyepiece. Conclusion: Although the use of PPE may not affect the length of time to intubate manikins, certain types of PPE may be uncomfortable to wear and noisy. Further research is needed to investigate whether this could be a problem in the clinical setting or in actual difficult intubations. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145543
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.414
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.231
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGreenland, KBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsui, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorGoodyear, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIrwin, MGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T01:53:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T01:53:18Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationResuscitation, 2007, v. 74 n. 1, p. 119-126en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-9572en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/145543-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Personal protection equipment (PPE) is recommended for use during airway management of patients with highly contagious respiratory tract illness. While its use in chemical hazards and its effect on airway management has been assessed previously, there has been no research assessing whether this equipment affects the ability to perform tracheal intubation. It is the intention of this investigation to answer this question. Methods: Eighteen workers at various level of training were asked to wear three different types of PPE while performing four different types of tracheal intubation. The PPE used included the eye shield, face shield and the Dustmaster™. The intubation techniques were direct laryngoscopy, intubation through the intubating laryngeal mask (Fastrach™) and flexible bronchoscopy using the eyepiece and an eyepiece with camera attached. We assessed the time to intubate as well as the incidence of oesophageal intubation. A short questionnaire was used to examine participants' subjective experiences of wearing the various types of PPE. Results: There was no significant effect on the time to intubation for any of the methods studied. However, all subjects found that the face shield was uncomfortably hot to wear. Fibreoptic bronchoscopic intubation using the eyepiece was particularly difficult with all of the PPE used due to the distance of the subjects' eye from the eyepiece. Conclusion: Although the use of PPE may not affect the length of time to intubate manikins, certain types of PPE may be uncomfortable to wear and noisy. Further research is needed to investigate whether this could be a problem in the clinical setting or in actual difficult intubations. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resuscitationen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofResuscitationen_HK
dc.subjectBiological hazarden_HK
dc.subjectFlexible bronchoscopyen_HK
dc.subjectIntubating laryngeal masken_HK
dc.subjectPersonal protection equipmenten_HK
dc.subjectTracheal intubationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshBronchoscopy-
dc.subject.meshInfectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshIntubation, Intratracheal - standards-
dc.subject.meshProtective Clothing-
dc.titlePersonal protection equipment for biological hazards: Does it affect tracheal intubation performance?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIrwin, MG:mgirwin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIrwin, MG=rp00390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.11.011en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17353076-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249995732en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros126390en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34249995732&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume74en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage119en_HK
dc.identifier.epage126en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248068900018-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK

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